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Social Capital

Welcome to Social Capital, a weekly podcast where we dive into social relationships and how the investment you put into them establishes trust, reciprocity, and value within your network. Your host, Lori Highby, will connect with top business professionals to dive into their best techniques and stories to share with you!
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Now displaying: June, 2020
Jun 29, 2020

Meet Richie Burke

Richie Burke is founder and CEO of GGMM (GoGeddit Marketing and Media) a marketing agency that helps brands including Trek Bicycle, Colliers International, Thrivent Financial, Komatsu, Marquette University and many more grow through services including podcast production and marketing, brand strategy and digital marketing. He is the co-founder of PodFest MKE and regularly speaks on digital marketing, storytelling and podcasting. He is also the host of The GoGedders Podcast, a local Milwaukee podcast, which is syndicated by OnMilwaukee over 100 episodes, and it generates 10,000 downloads per month.

How long have you been podcasting and why you decided to get started?

We started our show in 2016. The GoGetters, it's a Milwaukee Community big show we do a very wide range of topics. I had the idea for it and kind of started it back in 2012 as a YouTube show. And then I pivoted my business in 2013. I was a fan of some podcasts and I saw an opportunity in the local market. Again, not very many people at all, were doing it here. I saw a lot of national podcasts on marketing and success and stuff like that, but nothing really being done on a local level to highlight interesting local stories or business leaders via audio and Facebook video. So we started that in 2016. Very naively, we did a lot wrong. I think there's something to being different and unique and the storytelling was still pretty good. And it did pretty well locally, surprisingly. And we saw what it did, from a business standpoint for an agency and thought, hey, everyone's listening to audio, no brands are producing audio. Why don't we start podcasting for other companies and start offering this as a service and launch that service in the spring of 2018, and thought it was going to blow up right away, and it didn't. We got our first client five or six months later, but now we get to produce a number of shows for some of the brands that you mentioned in the intro and we significantly upped our production game at that time for ourselves and got serious about the medium.

Let's talk about the Milwaukee focus a little bit. Why did you decide your content should be focused in the Milwaukee market?

I think when you're marketing or starting any product, it's good to really start narrow and then grow from there just because there's so much noise out in the marketplace, and I would advise that to anyone starting a show today. And in 2016 there were very few if any shows highlighting Milwaukeeans and for Milwaukee as far as podcasts and not a lot of people were producing Facebook videos telling these stories. There’s obviously, more now, but I saw the whitespace in the market, I thought it would be cool to do, I thought it would be fun to do as well. And selfishly, I thought it would be a good way to network and grow my business and I don't have people on the show to sell them on my services, but that typically just happens naturally.

So you talked about some of the hurdles. When you started your podcast, if you would do it all over again, what would you do differently?

I mean, there's a lot of things that I would have done differently off the bat like much better equipment. I mean, we had good guests, we did a pretty good job of marketing it that's why it kind of still took off. Although I look back at the old episode covers and I think the branding was terrible on it. There's little details like that. I also think going into something with kind of blunt naiveness can be a benefit because you don't exactly know what you're getting into and how hard it's going to be and I'm sure you've experienced that with your show and just starting a business from scratch. Going in kind of blind and really learning as you go and adapting fast, and it can be a benefit. I think a lot of people spend too much time planning or trying to get something perfect and then putting it out there, when in reality, you launch something and you never really know how the markets are going to respond. I think it's much better to put something out there, almost build it as you go a little bit, see how the market reacts and then adapt based off of that.

Can you share with our listeners, one of your favorite networking experiences that you've had?

Networking for me changed a lot over the years. I think when you're young and you're starting a business like I was, you're trying to get in front of anyone or as many people as possible. I started my company going door to door. I was walking into small businesses trying to get them to run promotions on my deal site and get in front of them. And I was going to a lot of networking events and I think at that point, when you're new to the marketplace, it's good to just get out there and I think there's value in showing up. You never know what's going to happen a lot of times. I've gone to events kind of begrudgingly because I didn't know anyone that was there where I didn't really feel like showing up those after a long day or it was an early breakfast, but I just showed up and introduced myself. And those have ended up being some of the best connections and have led to business. So I think it's important to be somewhat strategic about where you show up. But you never know, the more you put yourself out there, no matter what it is, the better chance you have of it leading to something.

How do you stay in front of our best nurture your network in your community?

There's a number of ways. Our current clients are a big part of our network. So we're in touch with them a lot, whether that's me or people on my team. You know, we've built out our email list. We send out, what I consider, value added emails. We've changed our email marketing strategy quite a bit just over the last few months here. And then on LinkedIn, I've been posting a lot more content on there. We have our CRM, I know we both use SharpSpring for that where we keep track of our sales pipeline and make sure I'm staying in front of them or inviting them to our webinar or events that we have. And I think the more interesting things that you have going on as a person or a company, that you can add value to people, the better off that you're going to be, whether it's holding a webinar that's going to add value or any event or being involved in a cause and you can reach out to people with stuff they're actually interested in.

Digital networking or traditional networking – which do you find more value in?

I think there's definitely a value in the online game. Being active on LinkedIn posting content, actually reaching out and connecting with people but nothing is going to be face to face contact. Face to face isn't scalable, obviously online is scalable, I can get in front of a lot more people on LinkedIn and today we sent off an email that went to thousands of people that took a few hours to create and I got a good response. Nothing is going to beat face to face so I think it's showing up to those events or if you don't like showing up to events, reaching out to people you have something in common with or you may want to get in front of on LinkedIn and inviting them to coffee. Maybe you're less intimidated and just better in a one on one situation. I think everyone's different.

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more of less of or differently with regards to your professional career?

I think not worrying so much about what other people think of you is important. I think I spent a lot of time especially after starting my business trying to prove something which served as a very big form of motivation, probably not the healthiest form of motivation and I have a very people pleasing personality on the other side, which can be good in certain ways. But I've also procrastinated or avoided a lot of confrontation or tough situations, conversations that happen in business for any business owner. I think just getting that stuff out of the way sooner rather than later. If your gut tells you something's not right, go deal with it right away. Don't sweat the small stuff because small shit happens all the time. I think being a little more patient as I can be kind of impatient, I tend to have a big vision for things and things typically take a lot more time, energy and money to get them to where you want them to be.

Do you have any final word or advice to offer our listeners with regards to growing and supporting your network?

I think little things can go a long way. Again, some of my best connections have been from showing up to any event that I wasn't in the mood to go to. I think there's power in showing up. I would focus on what, high value, low effort, ways I can help my network out. And just simple stuff to separate yourself out if someone does something nice for you send them a thank you card. No one does that. Just those little things can make a big difference. And just looking to connect the dots for people can be very helpful and play to your strengths too.

How to connect with Richie

Website: https://ggmm.io/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/richieburke/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ggmmagency/

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/GGMMagency/

Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/ggmmagency

Jun 24, 2020

Meet Laura Nicolaisen

Laura has over 10 years of experience on the life coaching and career coaching side in the university setting and through my own business, and most recently at a start-up and in the outplacement industry. Her alma maters respectively for my bachelor's and master's are at the University of Nebraska and Concordia University Wisconsin. In my spare time, I love listening to podcasts, exercising, spending time with animals, reading, traveling, real estate investing, meeting new people and giving back to her community.

What is one rule of thumb that you live by?

You know the phrase treat others the way you want to be treated. I actually rephrase that to say treat others the way they want to be treated. So the way I kind of phrase that is really listen to who you're speaking with, understand what their needs and aspirations are, and treat them the way they want to be treated, as long as it's a way that you feel authentic for yourself and that it's okay with you. And the rule of thumb can easily be applied to networking as well.

Can you share with our listeners, one of your most successful or favorite networking experiences that you've had?

In 2017 I attended an event for professional leaders and the United Way volunteer community. I was a guest I wasn't a participant at that point at the Emerging Leaders Program and that's for leaders who are in their 20s to 40s who are giving monetarily and through volunteering through the United Way. I went by myself to this event, and I stayed and luckily met a great lady named Jeriah Ebling. So at that time I met Jeriah, she was the major gifts officers for women's engagement. After the event we connected for coffee, she told me about all the amazing opportunities open at United Way. I didn't pursue anything until late in 2019. But at that time because I had heard about this through her, I decided to apply and be a part of project lead training. So that's really a training that allows participants from diverse backgrounds in the Milwaukee area to learn about the intricacies of becoming a nonprofit board member. It was seven weeks long and during the graduation event I saw Jeriah and thanked her. And currently, I'm looking for the next board to serve on or my next volunteer opportunity, as well as investigating women united. So that's where women in Milwaukee and Waukesha provide their talent, time and finances to give back to the local community. So without that introduction, I've would not have had all these opportunities I just described. That was an amazing networking experience for me.

How do you stay in front of or best nurture the relationships that you've created?

Whenever I find out about an event, if I see an article or information about business trends, I really think about who in my network may this benefit. And then I reach out to those people and I share the information I have. And I also like to keep a spreadsheet of all my networking connections and recording when I met them where and how, and reaching out after an initial connection to either have a meeting via zoom or in person. A good rule of thumb I use to reach out to my network connections every four months or so. My goal is just to always offer my support expertise or connections to other people. And I feel strongly that when someone changes their mindset and thinks about how they can give back rather than what they can receive from a connection, that is really when connections flourish and remain long lasting.

What advice would you offer to business professionals that are looking to grow their network?

Finding some networking, professional associations and volunteering at nonprofit groups that are of interest to you. So the way I would recommend someone starting is picking out three to five associations of interests and attending an event for each of those organizations. And then attendees can get a real feel for is this a group that I would love to be a part of? And as someone continues to attend meetings, they figure out okay, which of these one of these one or two associations would I want to be a part of, you start attending, becoming part of the community, you really get to know people organically and develop those connections within the group and then as time goes on, sharing your connections and sources with others and others doing the same with you is just a natural process so someone's open to taking on a leadership role as well within the organization. I think that's really when network connections can become even more prevalent.

Let's talk about digital networking versus traditional networking, which one do ultimately find more value in?

I thought about this, and I really think digital and traditional networking work in tandem. So if I meet someone in person at an event, I follow up with them with a personal message on LinkedIn and with potential time to get to know them further. And in the case of social distancing now that's definitely gotten to Zoom or other platforms. I'm a part of an all women real estate mastermind where we learn and build and understand a wide variety of different types of real estate investing. Once I began the mastermind, I was meeting with all my mastermind comrades via zoom, since we all live in different areas. So it's been really great to be a part of the community where we are because we're investing together, we're learning together, we're growing together. We have accountability groups, and we're sharing connections. And I've also met quite a few individuals through cold or warm connection requests on LinkedIn, and email requests for conversations.

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more of less of or differently with regards to your professional career?

I would really tell myself to consider the different potential career paths that I'm interested in and find at least three to five people who are doing each of these paths, and then having some conversations with these people and getting to know them. And I would tell myself to ask these questions. What drew you into this profession and what do you love about it? What are the challenges involved in what you do? And what would you do differently if you were to enter this profession again? Who else do you know that I can talk to? I found that that's really one of the most important questions to ask when speaking with anyone, because usually people will consider and think of at least one or two other people you can speak with. And then your one connection is just rolling into three to five connections. And another question I would ask these people is what is the one way that I can help you now or in the future? And I would also share that the initial conversation is the most important piece always it's figuring out how to stay in touch and keep in touch with these contacts and building relationships moving forward, that are long lasting.

We've all heard of the six degrees of separation, who would be the one person that you'd love to connect with? And do you think you can do it within the sixth degree?

As I said, I'm involved in real estate investing now and one person I'd love to connect with this Warren Buffett. And I think it's definitely doable. Because first I’m from Omaha, and Warren and I are both alumni of the University of Nebraska. And in addition, my mom will tie school with this current wife. My plan would simply to be put a written note in his mailbox and share with him my love for investing for the city of Omaha for Nebraska, and ask him through letter if he’d be open to a conversation. And another piece I'll share is I work with a lot of clients and students in reference to changing or creating their careers and I regularly touch base with them on the power of alumni connections, because I consider that to be a warm connection, even though I don't know them because who doesn't want to talk with someone who attended the same school you did. So I always suggest this research and show it but if you go to your school's web page on LinkedIn, you can find where alumni are working and living and you can even start search for specific companies and see which alumni are working at these companies that you have an interest in or seeking specific types of contacts. And that's a great way to reach out to people.

I'm always intrigued to hear what my guests are listening to on podcasts or reading books, what are you doing for your own self-improvement?

So the most recent book, I just picked up is the “1% Rule” by Tommy Baker. It's really how to reach success like the top 1% do and he actually narrates his own book on Audible. So that's been a great book. Another one I really like as well is called “Meet 100 People” by Pat Hedley. And it's an amazing book. It is definitely most of the examples in there are college students who are meeting people. But it applies to all of us.

Do you have any final words of advice to offer our listeners with regards to growing and supporting your network?

I really resonate with this, especially within the last two years of myself personally. But if you have an opportunity that comes in front of you, and that really excites you, but makes you nervous at the same time, I feel like this is really a signal to move forward to do that thing. And I would just say, use your courage to take part in the opportunity to or to meet a new person because you never know who you'll meet or what will transpire and the more you use your courage, the more doors that will open for you and the more we in general will build and grow to be the person we're meant to be. And this is a great quote. I'd like to share it's, “Courage doesn't mean you don't get afraid, courage means you don't let fear stop you.” And that's by Bethany Hamilton.

How to connect with Laura:

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lauranicolaisen/

*I would love people to connect with me on LinkedIn. And I would like to work with one person who's a mid-career professional that is looking for a change and I want to have a conversation with that person. So the first person who reaches out to me on LinkedIn and mentions this opportunity. I will meet with you to discuss that next professional move.

Jun 22, 2020

Meet Roman Roberts

Roman Roberts grew up in foster care until the age of 9 when he was adopted into a family that was less than ideal. At 18 Roman joined the US Army as an interrogator and deployed multiple times to Iraq and Afghanistan, and worked with Special Operations. Once he returned home Roman had a challenging transition, and almost lost his family. It was there he finally found himself, and then utilizing his skills from the military and foster care he began to help businesses with policies and more.

Let's talk about you being an interrogator. How does that translate into the business world?

The first thing that people always think of when you say that is that it translates over in like an aggressive way of questioning, right? Like figuring out who did this or that and that component certainly does exist. But the main piece is, it's about rapport. It's about conversation. It's about understanding and really and truly, every business is in the business of communicating no matter what you do. How you communicate internally and externally, can affect the flow of your business. So, for me, really, and truly the thing about interrogation that I often use is that rapport and communication piece. Those are the main things that translate over and are the most important.

What is the main thing that businesses get wrong when it comes to policies and procedures?

I help businesses write policies and procedures using my time in the military, my time in aerospace and working with nonprofits and financial institutions and other types of businesses. And really, truly the thing that I always see is when people write a policy, whether they're at a growth point, they're trying to hit that next level, or they're in the beginning. It's always it's got to be perfect. It's got to be perfect. Yes, it's important that they have structure behind them. But it's okay that they grow and evolve and that they're not perfect. Because really, and truly, it's a framework, right? It sets those outer boundaries to let the business operate and flourish.

What did foster care teach you about business?

Foster care for me was an interesting time. And I was in a very interesting time in the system and I went through abusive homes and some amazing homes and it would change in almost a blink of a hat. And people have different names for it whether it's grit resiliency, whatever you want to call it. I say when I'm speaking to foster kids or anywhere else, your hustle has to be bigger than your struggle. So what's your why or however you want to look at it? How dedicated are you to this thing that you're doing? And are you going to be willing to work through the hard times? Like right now with COVID? Are you going to be willing to push through that wall, that barrier, whatever it is, to rise to that next level? Because it's amazing what you'll see on the other side.

What is one of the most important skills that you learned in the military that you brought over to business?

I think the biggest thing was helping others. Like at the core, the military is a service of helping its country or helping the country that it's in. When you really take that mindset of being there to help, and being willing to work through the hardest of issues or situations, and keep that forefront of service in mind, then that's really what drives success and whether it's individually as a contributor on a team, or as a business owner. If you're thinking about service and helping others and that selfless service, then you're going to hit the next level extremely quickly.

Can you share with our listeners, one of your most successful or favorite networking experiences that you've had?

My favorite actually came from LinkedIn. I got connected to this group called the Veteran Roundtable. And it just connected me to a ton of amazing people in all kinds of different fields of veterans, people who wanted to help veterans. It was because that was my first time to engage in a group inside of LinkedIn, and to see what kind of a connection you could build online. And obviously everyone now is kind of learning more about digital interaction through COVID. But at that time that it was there it existed, but it was really my first time utilizing that system. And it was a pretty powerful system. And it gave me a lot of belief in it.

How do you stay in front of her but best nurture your network and your community?

For me, so I operate from a premise of being real. And so for me, I just always be authentic. Be my real self. And whether that means that I talk about today I messed up, I yelled at my kid or I yelled at an employee or I, whatever, right? Insert any topic there, or I gave bad advice. Just being real and being able to be open about that gives a level of authenticity. But it also lets your network know that, hey, we're all on this journey together and I'm going make mistakes today. And you're going to make mistakes tomorrow. But if we're a network, then we should be able to talk about that and grow through that and push through that.

What advice would you offer the business professional who's looking to grow their network?

I'm a huge fan of LinkedIn. So I would say get on LinkedIn and stop thinking of it as a resume. So I literally would just copy and paste whatever my resume was at the time. And really, and truly, it's so much more than that. I mean, you've got people posting their own little raps or keynote speeches or paintings that they do, right. It's so much more. if you're showing up in that space and showing things and showing your true authentic, people are going to find you. But if you're not doing it, no one's going to find you.

Digital networking or traditional networking? Which one do you find more value in?

This is going to sound funny because everything I just said. I love digital networking. But sometimes there's just something really nice about being able to sit in front of somebody. So I think it depends on the type. But for me, predominantly, I do use a lot of digital networking and in this day and age, it's easier. It's fast. But I do think in person, face to face physical networking does have a place.

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more of less of or differently with regards to your professional career?

At 20 I was in the military, and I was in Iraq. So for me, I honestly would say, to realize that this is a chapter in your career. It's not your entire career. I was so wrapped in that military aspect of me being my life, that I didn't go after any college when I was in the military. I didn't do anything outside of military, studying, working out shooting guns, right? Like that was all that I did. So I think I would say be more involved in the world, and the things going on around you, like professionally and not just professionally in the military, but the general professions. And to just realize that this is a chapter.

We've all heard of the six degrees of separation, who would be the one person that you'd love to connect with? And do you think you could do it within the sixth degree?

When I first launched my “Real Talk with Roman,” I asked Jocko Willink to come on. He wrote the book, Extreme Ownership, he’s a former Navy SEAL, great just amazing content, love what he puts out, love what he does, love his podcast. So he's definitely a person that I would want to connect with.

Any final word or advice to offer listeners with regards to growing and supporting your network?

Don't be afraid to jump out there and take that risk. Not every piece of content is going to land and you're probably not going to be viral. But your intent shouldn’t always be to be viral. It should just be to connect and resonate with somebody and for me if I resonate with one person in a post, that's one more person that I'm closer connected to than when I started the day.

How to connect with Roman

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/roman-m-roberts/

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCu7Qir_0qdwHHQieIp47dTg/featured

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/realtalkwithroman/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/realtalkwithroman/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/realtalkwithrom

Jun 17, 2020

Meet Dylan Sessler

Dylan lost his father when he was 6 years old to suicide. In the aftermath, he struggled through a number of difficult experiences to include domestic violence, bullying, and suicide ideation. At 18, he joined the military as an infantryman and deployed to Afghanistan by 22. Dylan's personal struggle with PTSD, trauma, and the difficulties during his childhood brought him to the brink of life at just 25. He built Invictus Development Group to help others overcome adversity and choose to live.

What is your message and the goal behind what it is that you're trying to do?

I'm writing a book that that pretty much states it. The title of the book is, “Defy the Darkness.” So many things that I've been through in my life have really just brought me to the brink of life, of happiness, of sadness. I've seen every emotion from the bottom to the top. And the one thing that I want to help people with is to find a way to move forward. To progress their lives and defy that the pain, the struggle, the suffering, the darkness, everything within and take that step forward.

What brought you ultimately to start Invictus Development Group?

It started with my book. The, the idea of writing this book has been in my head since probably eight or nine years old when I actually learned to start writing. I just felt like I needed to write down my story. Not necessarily for other people at that time, because it was it was really just me and my way of expressing myself was always through writing and I just felt like I needed to write that. So I did it here and there but I never really focused it on a book until about four years ago when I started. Invictus Development Group came from the necessity to want to build a platform for that book and for the message of giving people the information that I have, because I've overcome all of these things. I've overcome so many mental illnesses that I've struggled with that it's time for me to build something that can stand up to my message.

Can you share with our listeners one of your most successful or favorite networking experiences that you've had?

My favorite is it started back in University of Wisconsin whitewater when I was going through my undergrad. I started just going to the veterans lounge to, you know, I guess I had just gotten home from Afghanistan, it was just like, I'm looking for a place that kind of fits me. I met a number of people there that had really changed the trajectory of what I'm doing now. I started undergraduate research on interviewing veterans about what they have encountered in terms of successes and failures of entering into college life and moving forward after they're in the military. I didn't know it when I was doing those interviews, but they changed my life because a number of those interviews got to a depth of talking about suicide talking about you know, depression, anxiety. PTSD, some very difficult stuff that that I didn't expect to actually go into in those interviews. Later it would come to come to a point where a number of those veterans called me later on, like six months down the road, two years down the road, send me messages years down the road talking about how I saved a couple of their lives from suicide.

How do you stay in front of and best nurture your network or your community?

Honestly, it's always tough, right? You can build a network, but the long times between connecting with people can really eat into that network because some people will forget you. But I think one of the biggest things that has helped me is the power of empathy. People will forget what you say to them, they'll forget what you can do for them. But people rarely ever forget the power of your story and the power of your ability to communicate with them, and the emotion that you gave to them. If you have the ability to be truly empathetic, and truly kind and offer who you are as a person, rather than your service or whatever you're doing at the time, people will remember that and you can go years without talking to them.

What advice would you offer the business professional who's looking to grow their network?

First things first is to understand yourself, right? I'm still even in that space of stepping into the entrepreneurial space and I wouldn't even consider myself an entrepreneur but taking a step into that space if you don't have an understanding of who you are and what you want to do. Not even in the business sense but in the in the long term. Who do you want to be type of mental understanding. You're going to be lost in that chaos of what the business world can offer you. And, and having that ability to just square up to who you are and face what you can and cannot do. I just think is so fundamentally important to building relationships and building a network 100%.

Between digital and traditional networking, which one do you find more value in?

I honestly think digital. The ability to market anything has its own place. You can write a letter which is perfectly viable and there's people in micro pools. Writing a letter will have an impact, writing a tweet will have an impact. For me making a tick tock will have an impact. Whatever niche you're in, is going to have a specific like, Twitter is going to work better for you or email is going to work better for you. For me, right now I've grown in the last three or four weeks, from zero to 5000 followers on Tick Tock in no time at all right? Like my Tick Tock has doubled and even tripled all of my other social media accounts combined. I mean, it's just the power of my message. And if you leverage your message in the right way, and you market it the right way it's going work.

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self. What would you tell yourself to do more of less of or differently with regards to your professional career?

That's, a great question. Especially for me because my professional life didn't really exist. I was really a full-time student at 20. And then not long after that I went to Afghanistan. So as if I were to go back, I would say, to have more of a professional life. To actually step into learning how businesses were run at 20. And I think that I feel like I slacked a little bit because the army paid for my school and I utilized that. I served and I feel like I've earned what was given to me, but at the same time, I didn't utilize my time enough for what I could have. And I wish I would have done more.

We've all heard of the six degrees of separation, who would be the one person that you'd love to connect with? And do you think you could do it within the six degree?

I would love to connect with Gary Vaynerchuk. I love what Gary's doing. Even now with COVID-19, he's posting up live videos where he's bringing on people every morning for Tea with GaryVee and just talking about pretty much the same mindset of empathy and kindness. It's awesome to see someone that has the same mindset as me, but a very different path to get there. I think if I sent an email or made a comment on a picture or even spoke up at a conference, he was here speaking at, that's just the power of Gary's that he would bring you on, for just speaking up. You wouldn't even need to use the six degrees of separation. You just need to straight up contact him, and I think that's pretty incredible.

Are you reading any interesting books right now or interesting podcasts?

I am not actually. I really took a dive back in March to learn people and learn the people that follow me, specifically. So what I've been doing is focusing, like hyper focused on finishing my book. For four years I wrote four chapters in my book. And I got him from Afghanistan in December, COVID-19 hit in March, and I finished six chapters in a month because of COVID-19. And that's what I've been, like hyper focused on. That is my inspiration. Looking at my book as the potential to help one more person.

Do you have any final word or advice to offer our listeners with regards to growing and supporting your network?

Just one thing, be empathetic over the long run. That's it.

How to connect with Dylan

Email: Invictus.dev.grp@gmail.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Invictusdevgrp/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dylan-sessler-69a29b19a/

Tik Tok: @invictusdevgrp

Twitter: https://twitter.com/invictus_devgrp

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/invictus_dev_grp/

Website: https://invictusdevgrp.com/

Jun 15, 2020

Meet Lucretia Anderson

Lucretia Marie Anderson is the founder of Joyful Muse Coaching, a social entrepreneur, educator, and writer. They have been using their background as a theatre artist, mindfulness coach, and team building workshop facilitator to bring creativity, compassion, authenticity, and self-awareness to the forefront of work, school, and home environments. Look out for their contribution as an author to Raising the Global Mindset: Empowering Children to Be World Changers (2020)

What led you to begin your coaching business?

My business or my foundation is actually in theatre and the performing arts and I began my career as a theatre arts administrator in Washington DC. I just always enjoyed being a part of something that was you know, meant to uplift the human species. So I got into teaching and working, in particular with middle school girls, an all girls middle school here in Richmond, Virginia. I was responsible for helping to evolve a character and leadership curriculum for the girls. And while I was doing that, I was working on my own personal development, I became a little bit of a self-help junkie. I realized that this was something that I really wanted to pass on to adults. I wanted to pass on to educators and other caretakers of children in particular And then particularly women, because there really isn't a need for this idea of transformational thinking and self-empowerment. And so I began this business.

What do you feel attracts people to your message?

I feel that we are at a pivotal time right now where we are all kind of searching for something that's going to bring us out of the bogginess of life. The way that I connect with people is through putting a focus on and the lens on that vulnerability and allowing myself to show up as a leader in that way and just showing my authentic self. I think there’s real connection to that and I think that when you are sharing your story and the highlights and the lowlights of what's happening in your life, and that you can still be successful, regardless of all of that is thrown at you there's real value in showing that.

Can you share with our listeners one of the most successful or favorite networking experiences that you've had?

So I was taking this class and I happened to mention that I really want to continue to separate myself out from the pack as far as like writing about mindfulness and writing about vulnerability. And as I mentioned that, I was introduced to someone who knew someone else who was in that class and they were starting up a blog in Richmond. And so a fellow blogger from that particular cohort of bloggers who are all contributing to that blog, asked me to join them in writing a book. And so as we are building our community around that book and sharing tools and guidance with the other collaborators there, I was just sharing some information with one of those collaborators on Instagram, actually, and she liked one of my posts. And I in turn started being followed by someone else who was following her and then that person saw what I had to offer as far as my knowledge and asked me to, in turn, be on one of his podcasts about mindfulness. And it took a few years to develop that particular chain of events of networking events, but I think it does just go to show how showing up in community, whatever that community is, and sharing about what it is that you do, what it is that you're passionate about, or what your interests are, you never know where that road can lead.

How do you stay in front of and nurture these relationships?

I think it's important to engage with people and show interest in them just as a fellow human being. I think it's really important for people to understand that as you're sharing what it is that you do that you are also just sharing that human connection. So whether that's commenting on someone's post, and I'm talking about social networking, online, in particular, using social media, showing interest and kind of commenting on posts, cheerleading and recognizing the work that they're doing. And when we're able to, again, whenever possible, showing up to events, whether that's online or in person. I think you have to be selective about what it is that you, where you want to share your energy and where you want to be a presence.

What advice would you give the business professional who's looking to grow their network?

You certainly can't do it in a silo. I hear of so many people who are trying to grow their network, but they're not doing it in a way that is coming from their personal interest. It's typically from a business standpoint just kind of looking out for other people who are interested in that particular service or that particular commodity. But I think that one of the ways that I've grown my network has been interest based. But I find that showing where your interests are in business and showing what your personal interests are, is a way to really, truly grow your network. Because like I said, before, people are getting to know you as a human being, then they're going to want to do business with you as well and find out what it is that you are doing or what you have to offer them as well.

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more of less of or differently with regards to your professional career?

I think primarily, I wasn't bold enough, or focused enough at that time to really understand what it was that I truly wanted to do. I certainly didn't recognize that there was a way for me to do what it is that I coach people to do now, which is to go grow inwardly. To have a really firm and good understanding of myself and the power that I have to really intuitively understand like the connections that I wanted to make with people and to grow my career in that way. I feel like there was a little bit of wasted time there. I mean, there are other parts of me that knows it's all a part of the journey. You know, one step kind of leads to the next and I feel like, because I didn't have that wisdom there, I had to actually go through some things to understand what exactly it was that I wanted to do with my career and my professional life.

We've all heard of the six degrees of separation, who would be one person that you'd love to connect with? And do you think you could do it within the sixth degree?

So I think my first thought when I hear this is Oprah. I'm gonna go slightly, slightly, slightly different path and say, Michelle Obama, I think I actually could connect with her fairly rapidly for some degrees of separation. She's one of those people that is just incredibly smart, but also very authentic in the way that she shows up and just shares who she is. I have a friend who is a CEO of their own diversity and inclusion firm. And they often work with a lot of politicians and celebrities. And I think more than likely they know someone in their network who has access to Michelle Obama. And so I feel like that's a path that I could take.

I'm always curious as to what my guests are reading or listening to and podcasts or audiobooks, anything you want to share with us?

One of them right now, and I actually do highly recommend it, is “The Empowered Highly Sensitive Person.” It's a workbook that helps to clarify what the world just kind of looks and feels like for HSP’s for highly sensitive people. And when I when I opened the book and just kind of started reading more about you know what that term means and how these people perceive the world I realized, wow, okay, that's me.

Any final word or advice for our listeners with regards to growing and supporting your network?

I think being your authentic self is going to be the most important thing and showing people who you truly are. The work that I do around vulnerability, I think, the mark of a true leader, or someone that you kind of want to be able to connect with is are they are they wearing a mask? Or are they showing you who they truly are? My advice for growing your network is reaching out to people especially during this time, introducing yourself or reintroducing yourself, for people who don't know who you are. And pull back the curtain a little bit to reveal your authentic selves.

Website: https://joyfulmusecoaching.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/joyfulmuseco/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joyfulmusecoaching/

Jun 1, 2020

Meet Charles Alexander

Charles Alexander’s mission in life is to help busy professionals stand out in a crowded marketplace that is filled with “me too” advisors. He does this by creating story-based explainer videos for busy professionals, like Financial Advisors, Insurance Agents, or anyone else that is in an advisory role, that helps them explain what they do and show personality.

How do you create the perfect little story?

I always work with clients who are usually in an advisory role in some way, shape, form or fashion. One thing I always want to get across to them a lot of the video out there right now is just somebody staring mindlessly into a camera rambling for about 10 minutes hoping to eventually land another point. More than anything we need stories in our videos. In my particular case, I have folks fill out this really simple six question form and from there is where I'll write the story. And what I want people to understand is that the hero of the story is your client or potential customer. They're the ones that need to see themselves in the story in the video. They're the ones that get to take this hero's journey, so to speak.

What are some of the best ways to incorporate videos in your marketing that ultimately help you just generate the best ROI.

I tell them first and foremost, your website needs to have video, primarily video above the fold on the landing page of the first thing that someone else sees, because even though there are a dozen different ways to drive traffic to your site, one of the most common ways from somebody in an advisory role or any small business or whoever it could be is still word of mouth or referral. The first thing people do is go to websites. They don't necessarily pick up the phone, they don't email they visit them online. When they do that if they go to your site and it looks like everybody else's, they don't really have a good reason to call you. You didn't stand out, you didn't speak to them. One of the very first places I tell people to put video, put it on the homepage, take off all of the jargon take off all of the used stock photos, get rid of it, put a video there.

What are some hidden do's and don'ts when it comes to video?

One don’t is don't make a video that sucks. I know that should be a given and I do want to give people leeway because you've got to get started somewhere.  I create animated videos. And there's the opposite of that is the talking head video. And if you'll scroll through any social media platform, you will see countless talking head videos. So the don'ts for those is, don't skip the storyline. Don't go in without a script. Don't go in without a plan. And there's a lot of people that just hit the record button. So do your point. Have good audio. That's one key ingredient that a lot of people skip. We will watch a grainy video with a good message as long as it has good audio versus a Hollywood produced video with bad audio. We won't watch it. We'll turn that off. So make sure you get you invest a few bucks in a mic.

Can you share with our listeners one of your most successful or favorite networking experiences that you've had?

I can tell you about one of the very first networking experiences I had, and we'll talk about what worked and what didn't work there. It was a chamber of commerce leads exchange. It's kind of an entry level networking place where you'll go in for 60 seconds, everybody will introduce themselves and do their elevator pitch. Nobody told a story. Nobody asked how they could really help anybody else. I think the best overall out of all of them was a florist at the end, who hopped up told a story about how they had just helped somebody. And that was it. Everybody wants to go speak to him afterwards. And everybody blew off all the high-power folks with nice ties.

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network in your community?

Primarily through content marketing that goes as much or more through email marketing and utilizing the LinkedIn messaging platform as much or more than anything. What works primarily is speaking to somebody as you would speak to them in real life removing all of the jargon, all of the sales pitches. Just speaking to somebody like you and I are having a conversation right now. If you will speak to somebody in a plain language in the way that you want to be spoken to, and you'll nurture the relationship, that way I send out one every couple of weeks, I'll throw in animated videos, or sometimes just text and sometimes I just ask them questions and hope to get a response. And that's an individual way it takes a little bit of time, but it's totally worth it, to reach out to people on a one on one basis.

What advice would you offer that business professional who's looking to grow their network?

Do it specifically. When I'm going out and making some new connections, I look specifically to people that I want to work with that are like clients that are my favorites, not necessarily even the highest grossing or highest revenue ones, but I tend to stick within a niche. So what you're wanting to do is find your tribe, so to speak, people you have a lot in common with. Look specifically for those people on your social media platform of choice. Or when you go to a networking event, don't go to just the generic ones that have one of every industry in it, go to a trade show, go to a convention of that target market and be the only digital marketing expert at the dry cleaners convention this year and be the one that talks directly to them about what they don't know.

Let's go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more of, less of, or differently with regards to your professional career?

With regard to the professional career, I would probably would have told him to consider getting an actual internship in a field to see if that's what you wanted to do or not. But quite frankly, a lot of the things that I got wrong, one of the things that I got right, was to allow myself to be open to whatever was going to come my way. I didn't have a clue what I wanted to be when I grew up, I just knew I liked people and I've been more into training and content creating ever since that point, so probably one of the better things I would have told him would be to study more and drink less.

We've all heard of the six degrees of separation, who would be the one person that you'd love to connect with? And do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

Seth Godin. And surely I could, I'm connected with 17,000 people on LinkedIn. Look, I got a couple of high profiles on there. I might have a second-degree connection.

Do you have any final words of advice to offer listeners with regards to growing and supporting your network?

You want to be different. You want to speak to people in a way that you know resonates. Not speak down to them or try to sell them just talk to them the way you'd want to be spoken to make sure that you actually have a real niche and that you can clarify. Of course I'm going back again that's why I like animated videos so much and explainer videos because you can work those in there.

How to connect with Charles:

Website: http://www.yourcharlesalexander.com/

Email: charles@yourcharlesalexander.com

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/yourcharlesalexander/

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