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Social Capital

Welcome to Social Capital, a weekly podcast where we dive into social relationships and how the investment you put into them establishes trust, reciprocity, and value within your network. Your host, Lori Highby, will connect with top business professionals to dive into their best techniques and stories to share with you!
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Now displaying: August, 2020
Aug 31, 2020

Meet Dr. Jim Bohn

Dr. Jim Bohn has organizational expertise and insight from decades of successfully leading leaders and business savvy derived from observing the organizational behavior of multiple Fortune 500 organizations. He has taught as an adjunct at UWM, Marquette and Concordia, and has spoked at conferences and workshops throughout the U.S. After several decades with a Fortune 100 company, Dr. Bohn launched his own Change Management and Organizational Transformation Practice.

So what is your motivation for writing and sharing your knowledge?

I've worked in the corporate world for over 40 years, I've worked with literally thousands of people through that time. And what I want to do at this stage of my life is to share my experience, specifically targeting southeast Wisconsin from the Madison, Green Bay, Milwaukee chord and just share the things that I've learned my successes, my failures, through my podcasts, through workshops through keynotes, through books. I mean, my books are obviously available worldwide, but my primary goal is to help southeast Wisconsin be successful. I've lived here most of my life. I was born in Milwaukee, worked with several different companies in Milwaukee area, including Johnson Controls. So this is the area that I want to focus on at this stage of my life.

What would you consider to be unique about how you develop your style?

I'm a persistent guy just based on the notion that I believe things can be done. It just takes effort, takes work. And so my style is to try to get things that are complex. And clearly in a PhD program, there are plenty of complex things boiled down into two new fragments and concepts that everyone can understand. So there's not a lot of theory, but it's more actionable stuff that we can all use to get things done. Getting things into a format where we can start to look at action that's going to be valuable for everybody is really key. We have to move from words and rhetoric, which is very important, but we've got to move to things that we can actually put feet on the street and get things done.

What should people know about the process you took to develop your capabilities?

My capabilities specifically, I want to talk about my organizational engagement scale. And that would be the primary capability of the work that I do. It's an instrument to literally check organizational engagement as opposed to employee engagement. Employee engagements used across the world, but it's starting to lose a little bit of its steam because it's been used for so long. And in my PhD program, I learned that no one in the world that ever checked the idea of being able to measure what would be called organizational level efficacy. So I thought, Well, that sounds like a pretty easy project. Haha. So it took me 14 different companies again in southeast Wisconsin to design and develop it. And then the capability that I have there within that instrument and those tools are able to measure whether or not an organization believes it knows where it's going. Simple, concrete terms that mean a lot to everyone. As far as my own personal capabilities, again, I look back at just candidly knowing where I was going and what I wanted to accomplish and sticking with it until it got done.

Can you share with our listeners one of your most successful or favorite networking experiences that you've had?

I worked with some people in my research a long time ago. And that person happened to be somebody I remembered. And I continued to work through my research. And when I got done with it, I went back and checked this person out on LinkedIn, and said, can we get together sometime and we talked a little bit. And before long, she connected me with a bigger organization in Milwaukee, who then connected me with more people in the manufacturing community than I ever could have been connected with, no matter how hard I worked because this other organization knows just about every manufacturer. Always look for those warm contacts, people that you know, people that like you people that trust you, people who are willing to have a conversation with you, and they're not threatened by it. It's not a cold call at all. It's like, gosh, I haven't talked to you in a long time, let's get together, but knowing that they also have connections within broader communities, and they may be willing to bring you in. That's, a really big one for me.

How do you stay in front of and best nurture these relationships that you're creating?

I think it takes a lot of care and feeding of specific people who you know are interested in helping you and who know that you can help them, I think that's a key in networking. It can't just be one way, it can't just be get me someplace if there's got to be some sort of give and take. By the way, I don't try to meet with 20-30 people a month, I'm more interested in meeting with two or three people that are really critical in my sphere, and then going deep, spending time thinking about what's going on, what's happening out there, learning more about where they're going, what they're trying to accomplish, and seeing if I can help them. To me, I've always been a big fan of the bite sized pieces. Let's go deep with a couple of things so that you can take this forward and make it successful. I think with most of life, not to bite off too much, but find two or three things that are critical, and give a lot of feeding to those specific relationships.

What advice would you offer the business professionals to grow their network?

Sit down with a piece of paper, yellow pad and a pencil and write down people that you know, that you want to have contact with that know you very well, they trust you. You know them and they know you and those people who have had some at least a good couple of years relationship with you. That is the starting point. Because in my mind, you cannot get a really good contact outside of them. Unless you have a warm contact with them. Does that make sense?

When you look at digital networking versus traditional networking, which one do you find more value in?

I'm a kind of a traditional networker that fits my personality better. I mean, I use the digital stuff as appropriate for follow up emails, contacts, meetings, and so forth. But I really like to get together with people to have them see me as I am. And then after that use the digital stuff candidly. I'll be real honest, I'm not willing to put quite as much work into the electronic stuff, digital stuff, as I would into the face to face.

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more of, less of, or differently with regards to your professional career?

Well, you're going find this funny but my 20-year-old self was playing electric guitar in a band. And working as an aluminum siding installer and a couple of other jobs because my 20-year-old self wanted to be a rock and roll star. What I would say to my 20 year old self is remember you have to pay the electric bill and the guitar is good, Jim, but you have to get a job that's ultimately going to build something for you and for your future. The guitar wasn’t the thing that brought me my income per se. I had to raise a family and I really don't think the 20-year-old guy could have done that. I think he got a little smarter along the way. But that's what I would say. Make sure you focus on an everyday building something toward a career that's going to have long term impact. And as I look at some of the decisions that I started to make a little beyond that, they definitely had the impact that I've had.

We've all heard of the six degrees of separation, who would be the one person that you'd love to connect with? And do you think you could do it within the six degree?

That person would be Barack Obama. But I don't know that I could get him through the six degrees of separation. I just think he's an incredibly interesting person. I mean, I'm sure that he and I would disagree on a lot of stuff. But I think sitting across the table with a cup of coffee would be very, very interesting. I don't know that I could get there with the six degrees of separation. I'd have to think about that.

Do you have any final words or advice to offer our listeners with regards to growing and supporting your network?

I think the key thing is to two things: take the long view, I tell people this all the time, take the long view. If you don't get exactly what you want, at this moment in time, if you can get 2% of what you wanted, and build on that, take the long view and take satisfaction in that. That's a good thing. There's three things. So the second one would be to reject rejection quickly. In other words, if something doesn't go right, just throw it out. Just move on. We'll pass rejection very quickly and that even includes in networking. If something didn't work, well don't spend a lot of time and not a lot of your own personal emotional energy going, why didn't that work, etc, you probably have a pretty good visceral idea of why, of why that didn't work out, but don't spend a lot of time there. And I think the other thing is, you have this sort of long term life crafting that goes along with the long view is that what I'm trying to build here? What is it in my life that I'm trying to build? Am I trying to build peace of mind for myself? Am I trying to build healing for other people? Because everyday, you can always look at that long term set of things coming together and say, yeah, I did a little bit more of that today. And they'll get me past the times when things didn't go right.

How to connect with Dr. Jim Bohn

Website: https://drjimbohn.com/

Twitter: @DrJimBohn

Email: james.bohn@att.net

Aug 26, 2020

Meet Deb Seeger

Deb is the managing director at BDO Resource Solutions. Deb has been recognized as a female entrepreneur by receiving the woman of influence award in 2015. Prior to joining BDO Deb was a co-founder of Patina Solutions. She spent over a decade in professional services consulting. She's an innovator, keynote speaker and panelists in the field of employment trends, workforce of the future, agile talent solutions and building strong cultures.

How do you tie in the personal networking goals that you have to align the goals of that of your firm?

Networking is so important because it's really part of everything we do as we go out into the business world. I thought of it from early on is this idea of really building friendships, maybe more for a business reason, but friendships to me start with getting to know people. And understanding that we can go a lot farther in with a group of people and the resources that we all bring together than we can alone.

How does one appropriately tap their network when in that state when looking for a new job?

Having been through a transition for really first time in my career, and also having been coaching executives in transition for many years now, I believe going forward, I'm going to be a better coach. Because I've already talked about the idea of networking. But I saw a lot of executives in my career who worked really hard to kind of build a wall of separation around themselves so that other outsiders, and sometimes competitive firms or vendors, providers, salespeople, you know, couldn't get in, so to speak. But then when those folks were at a stage in their career, where they were in a transition, they really didn't have enough of a network that they could go out and engage with in order to help them in their career transition. So I think it's really important for people to understand that you may never need to ask somebody a favor. And it wasn't until recently when I was in transition that I realized it was really valuable to have such a vast network of people that I've done a ton of favors for over my career. And I think about it as like the bank of the universe. If you're putting out favors and doing favors for other people one day, when you need something, you're going to have a lot of people that you'll be able to consider to call on for help.

Can you share with our listeners one of your most successful or favorite networking stories that you have?

My son who graduated from college in 2008. And as he was really looking at the job market, one of the things he considered was going back to get his graduate degree, which he ended up doing. I said to my son, if you see anybody in my network that you want to go and just learn from, because you have a lot of learning to do about the kind of career you want. And maybe you'll see people who are in careers that you find interesting. But you got to go and just go talk to a lot of people. So I was really happy number one that he did in the two years while he was getting his graduate degree. He spoke to 100 people, either by phone or in person. And what I really appreciated about his experience was he came back to me towards the end of that experience, and he said, Mom, not one person said no to me. And that means I did a good job of doing favors for people who were happy and returned to do this favor for me.

How do you stay in front of and nurture your network?

I think the other thing about having a giving mindset or an abundance mindset is knowing that you have to intentionally and deliberately schedule time for it. Again, there's a person who wrote a book and in that book, the author talks about his internal personal discipline that every day he decides he's going to write X number of emails to reach out to people or make X number of phone calls, or how it reaches out but he's going to do it intentionally. To let them know that he either saw something they did and wanted to recognize reward a birthday, an award, a news article. And so it's part of the everyday routine. And I think that's a good best practice is to really make time to nurture your network so that you are not going to ever be seen as the person who's only in contact with somebody when you need something.

What advice would you offer the business professional who's looking to grow their network?

Growing the network to me is kind of two things that are the same. If you seek to learn from others then you seek out others from whom you want to learn. And so that's part of that daily discipline that could be added to nurturing your existing network every day, is also then looking out and seeing people who are out there who are leading an industry trend. People who've written articles that you found interesting, people that are solving problems that anything that you're coming across in your daily, either news cycle or work of interest or passion. And then again, make time to go out and seek those professionals that you want to learn from. Because when you start with this idea of being open and first seek to understand, again, it's been my experience that most people are willing then to open up and share.

Right now, the traditional networking is definitely at a standstill. But between the two digital and traditional networking, which one do you find more value in?

It is hard right now that we can see each other in person but the idea of meeting in person in a way really only restricts you to a geographic network. And so while it's important to have face to face conversations with people, especially when networking or things around those things where the stakes are high. There’s nothing like in person but of course now that we can do online virtual meetings. That's better than any other time in our history where we can expand our network. And then thank God for LinkedIn where we really can use the digital network game platform to go out and reach out to people that we may otherwise never have been introduced to or known about. So I think they're both important.

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more of less than or differently with regards to your professional career?

The first thing about my 20-year-old self is not necessarily about my professional career, but I was asked this at the women of influence award is what we can tell your 20-year-old self? And my answer was, don't eat that. When we get into more of the professional career advice that I would give my 20 year old self, and we didn't have some of the tools digitally when I was starting my career, but it would be don't be afraid, ask it maybe even a perfect stranger, because to network or to meet with you if you really are genuine and authentic and your desire to learn from them and hear their story. Because most of the time that invitation will be met with an acceptance and so I myself fell into that same kind of thing that I think younger people do is I don't have anything to offer. And I had to quickly realize that as long as I was seeking with a genuine, earnest desire to learn most people won't say no to that now. People are busy, they can't fill their calendars with stuff like that. And so you have to be judicious in it. But I think it's to go out there kind of fearlessly with the idea that you have the right intention. Start today and start building your bank because the power of compounding interest is the same those relationships grow and they develop into really rich relationships over your career.

Any final words or advice to offer our listeners with regards to growing and supporting your network?

I would say, keep in mind that if you go out with the best of intentions, it's not it's not like it has to be a perfect science. It's not that you're going to break something and say yes, as much as you can. Because that’s kind of the pay it forward, giver abundance mentality that helps people build rich networks. And so I have been rewarded by people who did favors for me as much as I've been rewarded by knowing that I did some huge favors for some other people. And both of those things make us feel good. So what you're doing along the way is collecting these small gifts. And what that ends up is doing is building a strong foundation for yourself. So that if you are ever in a situation where you need to make a withdrawal from the bank, you're going to be able to do it.

How to connect with Deb:

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/debbieseeger/

Email: dseeger@bdo.com

Aug 24, 2020

Meet Tanya Stanfield

A brand strategist, sales leader, performance activator, and well-being advocate, Tanya is a multi-dimensional entrepreneur dedicated to using her superpowers of content and connection to build brands and create communities for good. Her most recent project, MKTG XT, is a cross-training community built for marketers of all types to gather and build stronger skills, stronger networks, and transformed careers.

What are some of the general struggles that everyone's experiencing right now in this current environment?

First, I think a lot of people are experiencing a lot of uncertainty. And some might argue that goes without saying. But we all know that a lot of times marketing is the first to go when companies are struggling financially. So that's definitely top of mind. It's just a lot of uncertainty. But I think another thing marketers struggle with, and I think particularly marketers who work in house, more on the client side, is the thing I see here over and over stakeholder engagement, stakeholder management, influencing others who might not work on your team with who you need on board to accomplish certain goals is a constant challenge that I hear marketers talk about over and over again.

What can marketing leaders do to support themselves and our colleagues during this time?

I think during this time, what marketing leaders and colleagues can do to support themselves and each others is through continuing to just connect with each other and keep communication open with each other and continue to learn, educate themselves and also educate others. You know, when we talk about those stakeholders, again, there's just uncertainty all across the spectrum. And I think the more leaders and their teams can connect with others outside of their disciplines and really learn about what they value, what your colleagues value, and then share what you value as well. I think that's really important. It's all about capturing that. Our job as marketers is to capture customer value. But we also need to capture company value as well. So learning what's important to everyone from the C suite, in finance and everywhere in between. So really building relationships with each other and across disciplines I think is really important right now.

So how do you personally continue to stretch and develop your skills as a marketer?

I am a self-admitted introvert. An error I think earlier, my career was that I didn't really reach out a lot for help. Or I thought I had to learn things on my own. And while being self-sufficient, is really valuable. I found the most value in the past couple of years as I've progressed more in my career, in learning through speaking with others, and talking to others, and that's just not in my own industry, although that's been very important. Because our industry just changes so fast. I don't think there's any way you can keep up with the industry completely. But talking to people who are actually in it every day is a key part of how I've been able to keep up. So like talking to people in my industry, and then talking to people in other industries and just learning more and more about how other businesses operate. That's really how I've been able to manage my own education.

Can you share with our listeners, one of your most successful or favorite networking stories that you have?

About five years ago when I was still working at a consulting firm, and I was pretty early in my career there, I was really struggling to understand how I can move up. I can speak in front of big crowds of people that's not a problem. But when it came to more impromptu speaking, when someone asked me a question in a meeting answering off the cuff, I would just get my heart would just pound I could hear it and I would get so nervous. So from then I decided to join Toastmasters which I'm sure you've heard of. Every Toastmasters group is different. it's an international organization, complete with chapters, local chapters, and I think in Chicago, they're probably like, over 50 chapters. So every chapter has its own unique culture. But I tried a chapter that was 100% focused on not just public speaking, but professional networking. It was only for professionals. You had to be a working professional. And after we would go through our meeting where someone would have tabled topics, which is where that impromptu speaking comes in. And when someone would do their speech, we always did networking afterwards and we would meet at a hotel. And I think I made the best connections professionally and personally on my life being a part of that group.

How do you stay in front of them best nurture these relationships in your network in your community?

I think that's something that is since I have met so many people throughout my career and my many businesses and all my travels, keeping up with that can be really difficult. What I started doing is I honestly started scheduling it in. And I resisted that for a long time because it felt I didn't want it to feel like another meeting. And it also felt kind of lame to schedule in keeping in touch with someone. But I found that I've had to do that not just in my professional networking life, but with my business, I'm terrible, but with my own family, because what doesn't get planned doesn't get done. So when it comes to nurturing my network I have regular intervals where I touch base with people and sometimes that can be a phone call, just dropping in on LinkedIn to people and just saying hi, and saying how's it going and trying to keep up that cadence. I think particularly with people who are struggling professionally right now, I just have such a heart for that struggle. I've been there before. So I really have this cadence going of just dropping in on people on LinkedIn and saying, Hey, how's it going? How can I help you out? So that that's how I've been doing it.

What advice would you offer that business professionals looking to grow their network?

It's time to start reaching out and it can be something as simple as you talk about that, that closest five, you know, determine who your closest five might be. And even if it just starts with two, that's a start. So I would definitely recommend doing that because It can be a little challenging if you start too big, it can be hard to sort of focus on where you should start. But if you don't have anyone to start with if you're feeling completely alone and sort of out in space, and I think that's really, that's how a lot of you are feeling right now in this new virtual environment, join a community. You and I were talking earlier about how virtual communities seem to be a thing. So whatever that community might be for you. Join it for a little bit. It's always a little awkward at first, and that maybe I'm just saying that because I am an introvert. And I'm not one to always feel super comfortable jumping into conversations, but it's definitely a start.

Let's talk about digital versus traditional networking. Obviously, the traditional networking has a lot of restrictions today, just in general which one do you find more value in?

This is a tough one to answer because I do miss connecting with people face to face. And I was just thinking about this this morning, even in my own work where I do a lot of sales calls and everything or I do calls with my clients. I am missing sort of going on site and seeing my clients because I do feel like that personal connection, there's just less distraction. I think sometimes that there is such a thing as screen fatigue, but I am finding a way to make it work digitally. Having conversation starters which I think is a really great way to sort of get digital connections going. But I also think digital is better in a way because I'm finding that people are a lot more open and honest about what's really going on with them in a digital space. I think sometimes when you talk to people face to face, they're not always super comfortable bringing up the things that are challenging them. But now I'm getting to know them on a deeper level because there's a little more comfortable sharing a little bit more about what's going on, the things that they're struggling with, the things that they're looking forward to, the things that they're not looking forward to the thing that they're fearful about. I'm finding that people are a lot more open to talking about that in the digital space.

If you could go back to your 20 year old self, what would you tell yourself to do more of less of or differently with regards to your professional career?

This is how I can get a little personal but I mentioned how I was going to those working events early on especially when I first moved to Chicago, and I would always go with a group. And they were sort of my buffer, but it was a big group so the buffer was almost like a wall. So I think I would have been pushed a little differently, I think I would have went to events with maybe fewer people. And also, I think the drinking aspect of a lot of those networking events was sort of the pull for us in our 20s. And I think because of that, I was able to do less authentic connecting. You weren't really taught to network in college and all of a sudden you're expected to do it. And you're like, what is this? I think I would have I would have approached networking groups a little differently. Oh, and join more groups and stuff going to more events, more affinity groups, I would have joined more boards. That's something I really wish I would have done in my 20s when I had a lot more energy to do that type of thing.

And so we all heard of the six degrees of separation, who would be the one person that you'd love to connect with? And do you think you could do it within the sixth degree?

I started my business three years ago, but it really didn't start taking off probably until about a year and a half ago. And that all changed when I started listening to a podcast called Earn Your Happy hosted by Lori Harder. Lori Harder and her husband, Chris Harder also has a podcast called For the Love of Money. And I will say hands down those two podcasts have changed my life. They've really changed the trajectory of my career, my business. They are both from Wisconsin originally. So I have to believe that somehow I am connected to them through the six degrees of separation.

Do you have any final word or advice off our listeners about growing and supporting their networks?

I would just say just keep on doing it. I know, it's hard in this virtual environment where we don't know when things are going to get back to “normal”. And I think it's really easy to sort of slip into isolation. I think that's something that I'm really concerned about not just from a professional level, but on a personal level. So I would encourage people to do what you can. And it doesn't have to be anything big. Drop one person a message every day, if you can just say hi, just keep in touch with people do little things to grow your network every day. Because over time, it's going to compound it's going to make a real difference. And it's just going to make you feel better about whatever business challenges or what challenges you're going through having a network around you to support, you can really sort of pull you out of a negative mindset and really help you see possibilities.

How to connect with Tanya:

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/trsgrowthstrategist/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/TanyaRoseS

Aug 3, 2020

Meet Jennifer White

Jennifer began her career as an engineer and combines analytical ingenuity with a talent for leadership. With a decade of professional experience informing her expertise in supply chain strategy and process and systems design, Jennifer is a talented communicator with a passion for motivating clients to transform their assumptions and achieve high performance. She is known for applying her sharp analytical skills to develop innovative solutions.

So what is a business transformation?

Business transformation is essentially a change management initiative. So we typically walk our clients here at the MJW group from a current state to their ideal future state. And we focus on four essential levers which is people, processes, data, and technology. So within those four levers, whatever you're trying to change it normally will impact one of those four essential operations.

Let's talk a little bit more about people, process, data, and technology. Why are those so important to business?

People are your greatest asset. It is important to have people available and willing to do the work that your company provides services for. People hold keys, people hold a lot of knowledge. They hold the magic is usually what I call it. Processes are what everyone follows. It's beating to the same drumbeat. There isn't confusion. Data is being the funnel of your business. You have inputs of data and you have outputs of data. You need it to understand how well your company is operating. They provide key insights into certain metrics and criteria to really understand your business in general. Without data, we would have no idea how much money we're making, how many clients we're supporting. And technology is important because without technology now in 2020, we wouldn't really survive the amount of manual transactions that one may be doing. Without technology it would really cramp your people. I mean, they would not want to operate that way. So it's very important to have the right technology embedded in your operations and your business to keep everything going consistently.

How exactly do you help businesses, especially those that have been around for many years?

Well, one thing I'll say is we help you increase profit. And we do that through expense reduction in automation. So obviously, with technology, it's going to increase the amount of automation within your business say, if your accounting department was doing invoices by hand, you know before and now you've brought in a tool that can assist them with automating invoices and sending it to the client without you having to send it yourself via email. I mean, that's a huge transformation. Also, as far as a transformation goes, with expense reduction, think about the redundancies that happen in roles and responsibilities. So if you don't take the time to really deep dive into what your people are doing, you could be paying for two or three roles that are creating the same work.

I'm hoping that you can share with our listeners one of your favorite or most successful networking experiences that you've had.

I would say on the social media sites I've really upped my game during this pandemic. That's how you and I met, right? And I've just really opened and expanded my horizons to learning from other people and just being open and willing to have conversations more than I ever have. And it has led to some great partnerships and collaboration. But otherwise just having more of the face to face networking in person I was limited to local areas or regional areas and now, being more open on social media has allowed me to connect with people all over the world. And it's a game changer. I can totally see the difference in what I'm doing and it's made a big impact on our business.

How do you make sure you stay in front of them best nurture these relationships that you've created?

Recently I've taken on developing more of a content marketing strategy. For our business, where, to me, it's mainly getting in front of our ideal clients, the experiences that we've had in the MJW group and why you should trust us with your business transformation or proving your processes or continuous improvement initiative. Content Marketing allows us to take a recap of where we've been and what we've gone through and highlight how we can help our ideal clients with those same struggles.

What advice would you offer the business professional who is looking to grow their network?

Just get out there, just have an open mind and open yourself up so you can expand. I can't tell you how much it's helped us grow and put us in front of people that I never would have thought about connecting with or offering value to them and them offering value to me at the same time. Just be open and willing to try new things is most important right now. As we shift into kind of going back to old ways don't do that. Be different. I challenge everyone to be different.

Between digital networking and traditional networking, which one do you find more value in?

I like both but I would say digital because I've been in it now for a good four months almost. I feel people are a little bit more genuine, digitally, or virtual access to people whereas in-person, you're against time constraints, sometimes. There's an agenda that's preset if it's a meeting or a guest speaker sometimes in person and you may not have a lot of time for networking, and then you're exchanging numbers and information. I think the digital transformation that's happening is kind of keeping people more accountable. You're being forced to look at your calendar more, you're being forced to do things online more so it's in your face more often than when it was networking in person when you may lose track of that person's information per se.

When you were 20 years old, what would you tell yourself to do more of, less of, or differently with regards to your professional career?

More of listening, less thinking I know the answer all the time. Being more willing to expand and learn new things not being afraid to learn new things.

We've all heard of the six degrees of separation, who would be the one person that you'd love to connect with? And do you think you could do it within the sixth degree?

One of my favorite mentors in my head is Jim Rohn. But I just fell in love When I first heard him speak on audio tape. And I listened to him quite frequently and the things that he was talking about in the 70s and 80s and 90s are still they still are true today. He left us a gift. And one thing I learned from him that I adopted is journaling and keeping all of your journals. I remember in a lecture he spoke about how his kids would have access to all of his journals once he passed away. And so for the last three years, every one of my journals that I've completed, I've made sure to keep them somewhere where they wouldn't get ruined and they will be intact for my future generations.

Do you have any final word or advice for listeners with regards to growing and supporting your network?

As I mentioned before, just have an open mind because when you open yourself up to learn from others, you will start expanding your own growth personally and within your business as well. I always teach people to educate and inspire someone else. So if it's your team always be looking for opportunities to educate and inspire them to want to do the same thing. Willingness to learn and be open and have an awareness. So if you know what I'm doing, how does it impact the next person and if you focused on that your business will continually grow.

How to connect with Jennifer:

Email: jennifer@themjwgrp.com

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jennifermw/

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