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Social Capital

Welcome to Social Capital, a weekly podcast where we dive into social relationships and how the investment you put into them establishes trust, reciprocity, and value within your network. Your host, Lori Highby, will connect with top business professionals to dive into their best techniques and stories to share with you!
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Now displaying: Page 1
Sep 14, 2020

Meet Takeyla Tyson

I am an Accountant with 22 years of experience. I started as a bookkeeper and grew into a leadership role. I discovered that I really loved the field and was always asked questions by small business owners an thought about my own business one day. In January of 2016, I launched KMT Accounting Services, LLC. I wasn't quite sure what I would specialize in and so I took a more a la cart approach when I started. I now specialize in taxes, business operations/consulting and general accounting needs.

Why don't you just tell us a little bit about how you got started in the accounting field?

I started as a bookkeeper and when I first got into it, I really wasn't quite sure what accounting was. But I did know two things; one, I liked numbers and two, I liked puzzles. And for me, accounting was a good mix of that. So I started as a bookkeeper and ended up getting some good opportunities with some local entrepreneurs who had a bunch of different locations that they needed managed. And from there, I grew into their accountant. And as I moved from different areas of expertise from restaurant to construction, I started to pick up a lot of different skills and here I am now.

What are some of the things that you learned that you didn't know before you got into the field of accounting?

I did not know the long hours. I'm still learning things that I did not know about accounting, honestly. And I think if you ever stop learning, you don't grow. So, in the beginning, it was the long hours it was all these crazy schedules and how they interact with them. Different forms and when things are due and all these crazy things. In the era of COVID I'm learning all the new rules, and what they're allowing and disallowing and things like that. So, I've learned to never get comfortable with the county.

What do you wish that business owners knew about their accountant or accounting department?

That they’re assets. Your accounting department, your accountant, they are really your gatekeepers of your financial health, which is critical to any small business and I don't think especially the smaller businesses really get how critical having a very strong accountant or accountant team is to the livelihood of not only themselves but of the business itself. And understanding that it's not just them, quote unquote, doing your books. They really are your partners. And they should be working very closely together to make sure that the company is healthy.

Can you share with our listeners, one of your favorite networking experiences that you've had?

Networking is definitely still a thing. I know people sometimes ask about that or wonder about that, but it's definitely still who you know, and how well you're off, how good you are at building those relationships. So I'm speaking to previous quote unquote lives and my career, I've always made sure that people knew who I was. And it benefited me when I moved into another position where I say, oh, I worked for this particular company and this particular position, and right away, they're like, oh, you know, so and so? And all of a sudden, I went from the someone who was just applying for this job to someone who was given this job. It was amazing, because it was that point for me, where I realized that networking was so critical, because until that time, I didn't see the use for it.

How do you stay in front of the network that you've established?

I do that by sending those emails and keeping contact with them on social media, whether it's LinkedIn or Facebook or Twitter, Instagram, wherever they are. Making sure I reach out if I see something that they posted or that they're talking about that I'm really interested in, I'll start a private conversation with them and say, care to catch a cup of coffee on me I want to talk about this a little more or you got 10 minutes for a phone call, I’d really like to know more about this and be genuine about it. People will definitely be open to talk about those things that matter to them. And then in time when you want some advice or you're looking for direction when you reach out, they don't look at it in a negative view. They're like, this person was always just looking for information. Let me help this person out.

What advice would you offer that business professionals looking to grow their network?

Get out of your comfort zone. Try to put yourself in situations where you don't know anyone and just really be genuine and honest with who you are, where you're going or what your interests are. I believe that every person if you take a good five minutes, you'll find one common interest that you can just launch a whole entire conversation on and just kind of break that ice. Whether it's your favorite TV show or favorite food, whatever it is. Strike up a conversation and then there you go. And then try to do something, when you do introduce yourself to those people who don't know, you try to find something really interesting and intriguing that will cause them to ask you follow up questions. Create that repertoire to where they want to continue to engage with you. And not just hi, my name is so and so and I do this.

Between digital and in-person networking, which one do you find more value in?

I still find more value in the traditional networking. Digital is great. It definitely makes for a quick, rapid fire introduction. It's becoming more digital, but networking nonetheless. I think those are still key. I kind of shy away from the I'm just going to randomly email somebody an intro or something like that. I do think email is a great way to kind of open the door and then let them walk through the rest of the process. I don't think traditional networking is going to go away.

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more of less of or differently with regards to your professional career?

I would say do more of traveling. Definitely. More traveling, more exposure to other cultures. Yeah, less worry. I think we spend a lot of our 20s just trying to get everything so perfect. I would have told my 20-year-old self to go into a lot of different fields because I think we get comfortable too young. And we're like, oh, I'm going to be a teacher well, try out something else. You never even thought you might not like. Maybe you're better being a chef or are you maybe your better being an architect or whatever, try a little bit of everything because especially your 20s there are so many internships out there. And you could try it for a month or two or whatever. The value of the exposure to those different fields are going to help you in so many different unexpected ways in your life.

We've all heard of the six degrees of separation. Now who would be the one person you'd love to connect with and do you think you can do it within the sixth degree?

I would try my best to do it within six degrees. But I would love to honestly sit down and talk to Warren Buffett. I would do it only because I do own some of this stock. And they do allow you to come and be present for the actual meetings. So that's my first foot in. And then I would network my butt off to get somewhere within 20 feet of him just to see if that gets me the other way there.

Do you have any final word or advice off for our listeners with regards to growing and supporting your network?

Don't ever miss that opportunity whether you're at a grocery store or you're going to Walmart. Take every opportunity you can to not just talk about your business but introduce yourself to people period. The simple hello goes a long way and a lot of times especially in this environment people are very starved for conversation. Just a simple hello could possibly open so many doors or give you new ideas or new ways of thinking about not only how to run your business or how to be more useful to the people that you want to serve. So I would say keep your eyes open, and keep your heart open and just keep doing it every day. At least introduce yourself to one person every time you leave the house.

How to connect with Takeyla

Email: takeyla@kmtaccountingllc.com

Phone: 414.367.6003

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/takeylatyson/

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