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Social Capital

Welcome to Social Capital, a weekly podcast where we dive into social relationships and how the investment you put into them establishes trust, reciprocity, and value within your network. Your host, Lori Highby, will connect with top business professionals to dive into their best techniques and stories to share with you!
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Now displaying: Page 3
Jan 6, 2020

About Gary Loop

Serving as a business consultant, executive coach, and life coach, Gary Loop has been transforming businesses and guiding leaders for over six years as President of Loop Group, LLC. For the last 12 years (of his 20+ year business career), he has been repeatedly entering new organizations facing various challenges. With his unique ability to develop deep levels of trust, from CEO to the front line, he rapidly gains a sense of the company landscape to deliver efficient and transformative results.

 

There are literally hundreds of consultants and executive coaches in the marketplace. What differentiates you from the others?

“I spent 14 years at We Energies, and We Energies at one point about a decade ago was last in the Midwest in customer satisfaction. And so, I had the opportunity, it was through the work of hundreds and thousands of employees to get it done. But to be in the front lines of watching an organization go from last in the Midwest, to one of the best in the country was outstanding.”

 

What is your core strategy for your consultant/client relationship?

“I'm a big fan of being a historian, rather than me coming in to find out what's going on now in a plan for the future, I spend a great deal of my time finding out what happened in the past. Where have you been? How did you get there? What worked well? What didn't work well?”

 

What do you believe are the top low-cost tactics organizations can employ that will make an instant impact on their business?

“The people is the big difference. Most of the payroll is people. And it's also in the planning. You know, if we can go through, one thing that I always say is, I'm not a firefighter. I’m a fire preventer. And so, we can go in and work with people that we have there.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“I actually wrote a letter to Jay Leno back about 20 years ago, you know, and pretty much because I wasn't sure if I wanted to go into standup comedy. It was a letter that basically said, Dear Jay, thinking about standup comedy. I have no idea. I'm not even sure if I'm funny. You know, here's the deal. You know, I was commuting to community college, I was living at home with time. And, you know, I'm like, here's our home phone number. And 20 years ago, a phone call came in...”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“Mine is more sense and feel. And it's also based on opportunity. So, when I meet with folks, I want to know what I can do to help them… the other piece I would say is rather than being interesting, be interested.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“It's overcoming that fear. You know, if there's an event that's coming up with a lot of folks and you may not know anybody, it’s just walking in the door. You know, the hardest thing is walking into the door. I call it eating your vegetables. There are things that we don't always enjoy doing. And sometimes we have to eat our vegetables before we get to enjoy the steak.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“it's a mix. We are in five generations, as you know, and everyone has their different flavor and style. And so depending on which industry that I'm in, I will try to mirror where they're at.”

 

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“Lots of moisturizer. My wife uses moisturizer, and she looks like she's 20. I look like I'm 90. So that’s number one. And number two is, you know, what's interesting is enjoy the ride.”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with, and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“I think like a Richard Branson kind of thing comes to mind. So, for me, I believe it's, you know, finding the ways to get in the door to reach out to those folks. I think the biggest hurdle is just not doing anything at all.”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“I've been reading Give and Take by Adam Grant.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“Go back to the give and take philosophy.”

 

You can get in contact with Gary at:

Email: gary.loop@loopgroupllc.com(link sends e-mail)

LinkedIn: Click Here

Twitter: Click Here

Dec 30, 2019

About Thembi Bheka

Thembi Bheka is the founder of She Breaks Thru, an agency that trains African women from disadvantaged backgrounds to work as technical virtual assistants. She believes in helping others reignite their passion, gain more clarity, and reconnect with their bigger purpose. She is on a mission to empower 1 million women by 2025.

 

What triggered you to start your business?

“I had traveled in Zimbabwe and I read an article on the paper about a girl who has committed suicide because she was tired of trading her body just to put food on the table. And that story just triggered a lot of emotions for me. First of all, it triggered my own history of what I went through getting out of my marriage, and it also triggered what I saw other women go through in Zimbabwe and every other woman who I was talking to about how they were stuck in abusive relationships because of money. And I said, I'm going to change this, I have to find a way to change it.”

 

What is the number 1 thing entrepreneurs can do immediately to scale faster?

“You really have to start working on your zone of genius and stop working on little things…and I'm not saying little as in they don't matter. No, but I mean the things that are not in your zone of excellence.”

 

How have the connections you have made helped you as you started your business?

“I think networking is the foundation of building a business. That's my opinion. I think just when you really want to build a business, you just have to start networking right away. And I'll just go back to when I first started investing in real estate…”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“I went to this event, my first ever online marketing event about three years ago, four years now, four years ago, and I had never been to that kind of event before. And I was lost. I was like, drowning in lost and I started talking to people in the lobby, who are sitting in Canada drinking beer…”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“I basically communicate with them through my email. I have a weekly blog and I have a podcast as well, where I basically share and talk about things in which kind of stays in touch with those people who I connect with. And they can see those in my email list. But in regards to the closer relationships, I try to stay in touch with people at least once a month, kind of just have, I call it my social day.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“Get off your butt. And by that, I mean just go to events, and it doesn't have to be events that are one thousand kilometers away from where you live. It could be local events. There are a lot of events in every local city.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“For me, it’s traditional. I call myself ancient, even though I'm working in a digital space. I find traditional more effective because you are meeting people in person and one on one.”

 

If you could go back 20 years, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“I would have taken more risks…and as much as I believe that I'm a risk-taker, but I always had those internal doubts within me that said, you know, ‘who do you think you are?’”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“I was going to say Oprah...”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“I listen to a lot of podcasts, but my favorite one is by Ali Brown. It's called Ambition Radio…But in regards to the books, I'm just reading one called Rocket Fuel. I just finished it, actually, and started a new one called Profit Fest.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“Just keep in touch because there's nothing as hard, or I find frustrating, as somebody who emails me once every three months because they're selling something.”

 

You can get in contact with Thembi at:

Website: www.virtualstaffondemand.com

LinkedIn: Click Here

Twitter: Click Here

Dec 23, 2019

About Gary Kurtz

Gary Kurtz is a sales and marketing professional, father of three, husband to an incredible woman, and a great friend to a lot of great people (not in that order). Gary works each day to be a little bit better in each part of his life and to make life better for those around him. Gary is known for hard work, big laughs, and going all out in everything that he does.

 

Where do sales and marketing meet?

“The difference between a salesperson and a marketing person is that a salesperson talks to customers and does more traveling. Other than that, they’re kind of meeting in the middle.”

 

What do you look for when interviewing new employees?

“More so than ever, cultural fit, I think is more important. Are they going to be reliable? Is there integrity? Can they stand up to your company's values and also do the job?”

 

What are the trends in the B2B purchasing world?

“The biggest trend that we're seeing in in B2B, and probably the same thing with B2C, is that there's a large, very large amount of decisions that are being made prior to anybody picking up a call. You know, people know that as soon as they are clicking on a link on something that they're going to be being followed in the nurturing campaign start.”

“You see an iceberg and there's only, you know, an eighth of it that's showing out of the water, and everything underneath it is where people are making decisions now.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“I met somebody at a trade show, like seven years ago. And like a half a year later…they called me, and they asked for just a small auxiliary product that costs like $300. And like we got to talk in that time. I was kind of saying them a bunch of headaches because their immediate supplier had ran out of something. If you fast forward, you know, five years now, we've done like $3 million with that company. And it all started with a conversation at a trade show.”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“The best thing that you can do for somebody is to reach out and just say hello every once in a while.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“Don't stop. I would say even when you're tired, and there's that event that's happening, go to it. When you're out and you're like, ‘okay, well, maybe I'll call it an early night tonight’, go out and do it.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“It's probably traditional, but when you're digitally networking, I think the best way to do it is to be moving towards traditional networking.”

 

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“I would save more, for sure…I would definitely say saving is one of the things that you have to do no matter what, even if you're putting away 3%.”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with, and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“Shaq is a sales and marketing powerhouse…everything he touches, it turns to gold basically.”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“I just started reading Rocket Fuel in the EOS stuff. And that would probably be the second thing that I would tell people if you're a young person, is that you just can't stop reading.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“Do something that's going to impact not only your life but other people so that they can find out who you are.”

 

You can get in contact with Gary at:

Email: gary@howardcompany.com(link sends e-mail)

LinkedIn: Click Here

Dec 18, 2019

About Christina Somerville

Christina Somerville is what you’d call a corporate refugee. Last year she decided to walk away from her 20-year sales and marketing career to better utilize her talents for connecting well with people and coaching others to do the same. She launched ConvoConnection - a resource of instruction and encouragement to help people have more genuine and enjoyable social connections. She feels passionate about empowering people to believe in their own social self-worth.

Every week through her blog she shares ideas, tips, and best practices for eliminating social awkwardness and self-doubt to make way for projecting social ease and confidence. Because socializing happens all day long, her topics can be easily applied to both personal and professional interactions.

 

Why did you decide to leave the corporate world and start ConvoConnection?

“While I was in sales and marketing for 20 years and in my personal life kind of, you know, offline, I would have friends and colleagues come to me and say ‘You know, can you help me with, you know, preparing for this interview?’ or ‘I’ve got to talk to my boss about this topic, what should I say?’ And so that kind of happened very naturally.”

 

You decided to enter the tech industry AND move to a new city. How did you both launch a new career AND find a new personal network?

“My husband and I, this is back in 2013, we were living in Cincinnati, Ohio at the time and we both were like, you know, I don't think this is our seed like I think we were ready to move on to something else. We had really kind of scraped our way through the recession of 2008. And we're just ready to kind of move on. So, before we decided to move on geographically, both of us kind of made a pact with one another. And we said…”

 

What one question can you always ask to open up any networking conversation?

“I read an article about Terry Gross from NPR. And she says that she always asked this question at the start of her interviews, and I'm like, this is brilliant. And she says all she has to say is ‘so tell me about yourself.’ And what's so brilliant about that question, in my opinion, and she even acknowledges, is that it puts the onus on the interviewee to share what they want to share.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“One of the best outcomes of my work, it wasn't actually to my benefit. It was to my husband's…when you interact with a whole bunch of people, sooner or later you're going to run into super connectors. And these are people who are usually like recruiters. They just know everybody. There's this other gal who I met who she is like, she's the mayor of Portland. She knows everybody…”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“What's right in front of you takes your attention. And if you don't keep up on it, time passes on and when time passes on the relationship kind of grow stale. And this is both personal and professional. So, what I do is I kind of set appointments for myself.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“Think about just being kind of the outlier and just make the first move. People would really appreciate it, that you go up and introduce yourself.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“It's probably is a hybrid. But yes, I would lean more on in-person networking…it's very efficient to make those initial connections today via LinkedIn or any kind of social media but like, let's go further than that.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“Remember that almost everybody wants to connect and you making the first step is it pays dividends and people really do appreciate it so put in a little bit of effort lean in a little bit and you'll be really pleased and surprised about what you find.”

 

You can get in contact with Christina at:

Website: www.convoconnection.com

LinkedIn: Click Here

 

Check out Christina’s blog post about making friends in a new city! Click here.

Dec 16, 2019

About Brianna Rooney

Brianna Rooney, (AKA the Millionaire Recruiter) is 34 years old, owns Techees, has three houses, a top 100 restaurant www.mouthfuleatery.com, an amazing Chef of a husband and two little kids. Diego Danger (yes that's his real middle name) 5 years old, and a sweet little 2-year-old girl, Lima Ariel.

Her very successful recruiting firm is the star of the show, www.techees.com.Techees is a firm that places highly sought-after software professionals with companies in the Bay Area that are high profile, high growth, VC-backed profitable pre-IPO and or public. Brianna takes the matchmaking approach. Hiring is all too similar to dating. If you want to do it right, you have to take the thoughtful road without all the fluff.

 

How did you get the name, the millionaire recruiter?

“It was by one of my employees, Ben Markowitz, who has been with me now for six, six and a half years. And he goes, ‘Hey, do you understand like how powerful your training is here and how I don't think anyone else does it like this?’…he's like, ‘yeah, I think we should make an e-course.’ So, he goes ‘and we're going to call you the millionaire recruiter ‘cause that’s what you are.’”

 

What's the best way to work with people that feel threatened by you doing a better job than you do?

“It's a topic about, I think, you know, the emotional intelligence. And it’s something I'm actually currently putting my whole team through, actually eight different workshops on this. And I think that this comes from being really self-aware and also realizing that people's intentions are not bad.”

 

How do you build relationships without coming off like a salesperson?

“We are more relationship builders. And once you realize that not every head has a dollar sign on it, that we're actually human beings and that, you know, paying it forward is really important. And maybe we're not making money off of this one conversation, but maybe this one conversation is then going to turn these three others because that person enjoyed you and then they'll recommend you. So, if you don't see like the bigger picture, I don't think you can truly be successful.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“one of my most favorite networking things was in person and it was when we went to Women Who Code, it was a meetup group and we actually had a booth and I've never done that before…”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“I'm a really big believer in notes. Actually, I got it from, randomly, my gynecologist. So, you see this person once a year and she keeps amazing notes. So, every time I see her, even though it's been 365 days, she gets out her notes and she starts asking me about things that we talked about last year that I didn't even realize she wrote down.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“People need to realize that people really enjoy talking about themselves and they don't always get the opportunity. So, if you give them the opportunity, they'll jump on it. So, I think if you're going to start reaching out and start having connections and relationships, then you definitely have to give.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“Digital, absolutely. I'm not saying that it's my favorite, but…it's the fastest. You can do it anywhere. People are always on their phones, which is a good and bad thing. I just think it's the way to go.”

 

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“I would have put myself out there a long time ago. So…I'm not a giant fan of social media because I think a lot of it can be fake or perceived, you know, a lot better than things actually are. So, I was always like under the radar…”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with, and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“I first think of Will Smith, of course. He's, I'd like to think so. You know, what’s funny is he actually does live in my town and I’ve never seen him.”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“I am actually reading, for the second time, The 100X Leader…and it is the most amazing, powerful book I have ever read.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“Always put that smile on your face and just move forward. And know again that the bigger picture is very important.”

 

You can get in contact with Brianna at:

LinkedIn: Click Here

Email: brianna@techees.com(link sends e-mail)

Website: www.themillionairerecruiter.com

Dec 11, 2019

About Lauren Marsicano, Esq.

Lauren Marsicano, Esq. is the founder of the Networking Maverick community where she helps her clients turn their networks into net worth. Lauren has been recognized as a “Top 40 under 40 Lawyer in the Nation” by the American Bar Association and has been named “2019 Florida Super Lawyer, Rising Star.” She received her law degree from the University of Miami and has studied at Oxford University. For more helpful tips and motivation, join her mailing list at www.NetworkingMaverick.com.

 

In the age of social media, do you believe in-person networking is obsolete?

“I have always thought that in-person networking is where the magic happens. I think social media and social media networking should always be a subsidiary of it. It should support it and be kind of a subset of what you're doing. Because I think it's undeniable nowadays. If you don't have an online presence, you don't have social capital, right?”

 

For the introverts out there, what advice do you have for them on how to network and make connections?

“For introverts, my biggest tips are number one, if you already made the effort to go to an event, just think that you already took that initial step, right? So, your heart is in the right place. Your mindset is in the right place. Maybe you're just failing to plan effectively. So, I did release a Networking Maverick pocket guide that kind of goes through steps and guides you, but I think the biggest things that hold introverts back, is they get overwhelmed.”

 

What is something people always ask you when starting a new business?

“People kept asking how are you doing this? How are you making money from it? I feel like this is a drain I should just do online networking. I'm wasting time. And I kept saying it's how you plan it out. It's how you're strategizing that is lacking. Do you actually really know your target market? Do you know your target market’s target market? Because your target market is going to events to target their market. So, why not go to those events?”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“I had an event on Monday and it was my first big event in by big event. I mean, more than 100 people, 150 people ended up coming. It was amazing. The turnout, the energy, everything. But it was my first time planning that size event...”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“This is where social media has come in a lot. I think that it really allows you to nurture your audience when you're not able to.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“Well, I definitely think social media presence is great, but you need to be getting out there and doing in-person networking. And I can't stress that enough.”

“My five steps for it are identifying, researching, planning, showing up and follow up. So, if you're not doing those things, you're not making money from it. You're not making connections from it. You're not turning your network into net worth.”

 

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“What I neglected because between my 20s and now I've still moved probably six times. And I did not keep in touch with new addresses as much. And, you know, now it's easier you can get emails and, and that sort of thing. But when I was in my 20s, I wasn't keeping track of it as much as I should. And people have moved and I've lost touch with them.”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with, and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“The person right now that I'm trying to manifest that I'm going to meet in the next year is Marie Forleo.”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“I listen to a lot of audiobooks. I don't read as much hard books anymore, just so much easier to listen to podcasts or listen to an audiobook. The one I'm listening to right now is called Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“You’ve got to get yourself out there, and the more you do it, the more comfortable you're going to get.”

 

You can get in contact with Lauren at:

Email: lauren@networkingmaverick.com(link sends e-mail)

Website: www.networkingmaverick.com

YouTube: Click Here

Instagram: Click Here

LinkedIn: Click Here

Dec 9, 2019

About Stacey Chillemi

Stacey Chillemi is a popular, recognizable lifestyle reporter, expert, columnist, and health host. Author of The Complete Guide to Natural Healing along with 20 other published books. She is the founder of thecompleteherbalguide.com. Stacey has been on numerous lifestyle and health-related TV and radio programs, and is a recognized health and natural remedies expert, with over 20 years in practice as a Health Coach. Stacey has been a guest on the Dr. Oz Show, local news, and numerous radio shows.

 

Why is reducing stress so important, especially around the holidays?

“People don't realize it, but like 60 to 90% of all illnesses are stress-related illnesses. Many people don't realize that a lot of things such as heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cholesterol, depression, many things come from stress.”

 

How do the foods we eat affect our bodies?

“When we eat a lot of foods that aren't natural, that are processed or have a lot of artificial ingredients and chemicals that shouldn't be in foods but are in foods to keep the foods fresher longer or looking to make them look more plumper, those ingredients and those processed foods get in our bodies. And it's very hard for our bodies to break those chemicals or those artificial ingredients or those foods in general down. And when they do break it down, a lot of times you feel sluggish.”

 

What are some ways to improve our holiday eating habits?

“Know when to listen to your body and to, you know, eat reasonable portion sizes. You know, you could always cheat and have fun and have your cookies and have a little cake here and there, but just don't overdo it.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“I had one time written a book on epilepsy and I taught people how to cope with epilepsy in the book and shared a lot of good tips on how to get on with life. And you know, I shared a lot of my own stories and other people’s stories in it. And a person had walked by one day in Barnes and Nobles and they picked up the book and they…”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“I like to use YouTube and I like to, on my website thecompleteherbalguides.com, I share a lot of articles and I really encourage people to contact me and to ask questions.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“It takes time. I see a lot of people get frustrated. They try to grow their network and they don't see results right away and they get frustrated. It takes time and it also, it takes quality. I tell people it's not quantity. It's quality.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“I think our society is going towards more videos and going more digital. You know, as time goes on, people are looking for a quick answer. People don't like to read as much as they did.”

 

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“I probably would have did things a little bit differently where I would have did more public speaking and I would've did more videos.”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with, and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“One person I think is really great. I think Dr. Axe did a great job. He started out as a chiropractor and he had his mother (whom) had an illness, I believe it was cancer. And he tried to find a healthy way to, you know, a healthy way to help her overcome her cancer.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“Be 100% passionate at what you do and always be very supportive to other people and give encouragement and motivation and inspiration.”

 

You can get in contact with Stacey at:

Website: www.thecompleteherbalguide.com

LinkedIn: Click Here

Dec 4, 2019

About Dave Molenda

After almost 30 years of running his own company and growing it to $10 million in annual sales before selling it, Dave realized his passion was helping companies thrive by overcoming their natural tendencies to retreat, not talk about the hard stuff, and spin their wheels on the wrong things. His company, Positive Polarity, acts as the opposing force against the easy way of doing business—the way it’s always been done—with a positive and encouraging approach.

 

You wrote an Amazon #1 Best Selling book called Growing on Purpose, what is it about?

“We spent a lot of time on talking about growing a team and then we spent a lot of time talking about improving the customer's experience. There's not a lot of research done that connects the two. So, this book really connects the two.”

 

How can it help a business get ahead in today's business climate?

“So many people spend time on strengthening their team. They'll have a great team and then they may struggle with how to have a great experience or they may have a team that's not very solid, but they tried desperately to do great customer experience. So, when you’re able to do both, profit automatically happens.”

 

Let’s talk about engaged employees. How important are they in the workplace today?

“Statistics from Gallup show that one in three people show up every day for work and they have two things on their mind. They want to improve themselves and they want to improve their company. So, I was shocked when I found that out. It's only one in three.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“I do monthly trainings at the Better Business Bureau Milwaukee. And one of the big reasons that I do it is for networking opportunities. And earlier this year, I had somebody in transition in between jobs. Just, you know, and everybody introduces themselves at the beginning. So, you get to know who's all in the room. There's usually 20 to 30 people in the room and a guy said, I'm in transition. This is what I want to do. And oddly enough, the guy sitting next to him needed that exact thing.”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“I think once you define your network, then what I started doing is, I'm looking for ways to connect the dots. I want to make sure that I add value first.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“I tell my clients to find out where your ideal clients are. Again, it's another situation where if you're selling something that is primarily, let's say you're a realtor in the Lake Country area, doing something in Racine or Kenosha probably isn't going to be an effective use of that time.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“It depends again on what your network community looks like. Digital is global… If I had to pick one for me, I like face to face way better than digital because, as a business coach, the sandbox that I play in is local.”

 

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“I would tell myself, you know, to be more purposeful. And then I would also, based on those statistics we talked about, definitely set more goals.”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with, and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“My focus is trying to find people that I can help. So, I don't even have an answer on the six degrees of separation and maybe this is a blind spot of mine. I'd never thought of it. And even when I was preparing for this, thinking about it, I'm like, I don't even know the answer to that. I'm like, I'm focused on the behavior side for people.”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“Actually, right now I'm reading The Happiness Project by Gretchen Rubin and I totally don't even know how I got it. I read about a book a quarter. Okay. So, and she's talking about how to be happier and it just seemed like it was like, huh. It was light and not light, but it was lighter. It was not a business book as much as it is a self-help book.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“Networking needs to be a win-win. There's two people involved in networking and if it doesn't benefit both people, then I don't think it was successful networking.”

 

You can get in contact with Dave Molenda at:

Email:  dave@positivepolarity.com(link sends e-mail)

Phone: 414-322-2358

Website: www.positivepolarity.com

LinkedIn: Click Here

Nov 27, 2019

About Jacob Carlson & Ian Buchanan

Jacob Carlson graduated from the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse as a Business Management major with an emphasis in Marketing, along with a minor in Sustainable Business. Jacob specializes in customer life cycle marketing focusing on customer retention and brand loyalty for Concentrix as a Program Coordinator, where he is employed full-time. Jacob is also the co-founder of Helium, which is a new start-up in Milwaukee, dedicated to bringing books to readers.

Ian Buchanan learned the necessity of relationship-building to success while part-owner and operator of a budding lawn care business in high school. Now, with his long-time friend and past business partner, Jacob, Ian has launched Helium - a free book delivery service offered in his hometown of Milwaukee. Ian works full-time in a financial consultant role, spending nights and weekends developing Helium, much of his time being spent leveraging connections in an effort to grow the business.

 

What is Helium?

Ian: “I noticed a big inefficiency within the system. Libraries have, you know, limited books at each library. But this, the Milwaukee County system works together so they share resources and I realized if I wanted a book in my local library, it might not be there, but it might be at a library a few miles away. So, why not take that step out of it, take my travel out of it and have someone do it for me. So that's where the idea came for Helium where we deliver the books for you. We bring them from the library that they're at within the system to your desired location.”

 

What methods and avenues have you explored while trying to build your network and getting the message out about your company Helium?

Jacob: “Recently, it's just been reaching out to a lot of different media outlets and media mediums. I'm really just following up via email and you know, working connections that we've either had from the past, whether it be through school or even family friends, and really just making sure of, hey, this is our idea, this is helium and selling more or less right now the idea of rather than us.”

 

How have you, and how are you tackling this? Especially while you're working full time.

Ian: “It's tough. Obviously, you're working from nine to five and you're devoting that time to the job that's generating your income and you have to, and it's the right decision. But you know, it's really taking advantage and leveraging your nights and weekends from our opinion.”

 

Any advice you can offer on still having somewhat a social life and engaging with family and friends as well?

Jacob: “I think just setting priorities. And again, even just your note about time management is absolutely huge because you know, you're tied down to so many obligations outside of work just in life with hanging out with friends, family affairs, et cetera, let alone running a business on this side.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

Jacob: “I would say look no further than, you know, our mutual friend and actually a family friend of ours, Martha Kerrigan. And they've just been a huge, huge blessing obviously to my family and me in general outside of Helium. But even Helium in general.”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

Ian: “I think we all get inundated, whether it be on LinkedIn, through email with connection requests and you know, pleads for our time and a lot of that. A lot of the time we just let that go by the wayside. We deem it non-important, but for the ones for the main connections that do stick, I think it's important to just go beyond that initial meeting.”

Jacob: “we're reaching out to local podcasters like yourself, we're reaching out to different media outlets and really just carving the time…”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

Jacob: “Just make a point to reach out. I did read a book a few months ago, just, I forget the title of it. The whole purpose of it was to just set aside time each and every day to reach out to people that you think could be valuable to add to your network.”

Ian: “You can essentially create an own your own roadmap from, you know, other people with a certain job title maybe that you're aspiring to have.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

Ian: “I'm definitely more introverted personality-wise…So, I kind of tend to gravitate towards that digital, definitely. Not anything against your traditional networking. For me, it's just a little bit more intimidating.”

Jacob: “With digital networking, in today's day and age, you just have more poles in the water. It's so much easier to get a response and connect with people instead of, you know, maybe just having two or three poles in the water where you know, you're trying to follow up or meet him at a certain obligation or event.”

 

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

Ian: “Just do something, because I was just so, I mean, being introverted I was just so passive and I knew, I mean I guess I didn't really know exactly what I wanted to do, but I knew that a finance or accounting related role was in the future coming out of graduation…”

Jacob: “just taking a step back and applying some type of focus. I think especially, you know, just at the undergraduate level. In my experience, it's so easy to just get bogged down in, you know, just certain capstone classes whether you have a job or not. And one thing I wish I would've done is sticking with the American marketing association at the University of Wisconsin – La Crosse, something I did my junior year absolutely loved it.”

 

What book are you reading right now?

Ian: “The book I'm currently reading is called Bad Blood by John Carreyrou. It's kind of an exposé on Theranos, a Silicon Valley startup that was once valued at $9 billion back in 2013, I think it was. And it's gone defunct since and it really just details kind of how everything was a fraud from the get-go.”

Jacob: “I'm reading, and I actually just finished reading, gosh, want to say yesterday, maybe the day before; it's called Untethered Soul: A Journey Beyond Yourself. And it's really just focused on awareness and consciousness and really taking a step back.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

Jacob: “Don't be afraid to take gambles, take risks, bet on yourself.”

Ian: “You're going to deal with a lot of rejection or just no responses, if you reach out to people…just brush it off.”

 

You can get in contact with Jacob and Ian at:

Jacob’s Email: jacob@heliumbooks.com(link sends e-mail)

Ian’s Email: ian@heliumbooks.com(link sends e-mail)

Jacob’s LinkedIn: Click Here

Ian’s LinkedIn: Click Here

Nov 25, 2019

About Raj Daniels

Since 2001, Raj has been assisting individuals to improve strategy and performance in business and personal lives.

Raj helps executives, entrepreneurs and business owners who are struggling to clarify and prioritize their focus so that they can be more intentional and accomplish their goals.

He’s been referred to as a guide, educator, and mentor by many in the Dallas business community and startup ecosystem.

As of May 2019, Raj has stepped into the role of Director of Strategic Partnerships.

 

Why do you believe networking is important?

“I grew up in Southeast London and I didn't have a strong support community. And when I look back in my life and see the trajectory and the route I've taken, I look back and think to myself, what would it look like if I had a network and intentional network if I had started out younger?”

 

What do I think about digital/social media networking?

“I think it's a weak substitute, at best. You know, I know there are a lot of platforms out there and…you know, you can connect with friends, connect with people, but connecting with an inanimate device is, you know, it doesn't connect to your soul.”

 

How can networking improve society?

“I've made it a practice to lead what I call three new people a week for many, many years now. And I'm agnostic. It doesn't matter what they do, where they're from, demographics, you know, socially. And what I found is that when you sit down with an individual, you realize that you have more in common with them than you don't.

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“I met one of the founders of Nexus PMG at a networking meeting that I have been attending for four years, and I met him, it was about two or three years ago. He was relatively new to the community and I essentially opened up my notebook and my Rolodex to him.

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“That's one area where technology has made life easier. It's so much easier today to pick up the phone, to get on a computer, you know, send a text message…”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“Approach it with a heart of abundance and looking to give. You know, I have a little phrase written on my whiteboard here. It says, "the day you plant the seed is not the day you eat the fruit." And what I mean by that is that sometimes you know, you can just tell where people come into a meeting and it's a very transactional meeting and I'm sure there's a time and place for that, but I think when you're truly networking, you're looking to give, you're looking because you care, you're looking because you want to see the other person succeed.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“Traditional, all day long. If it's digital, then LinkedIn only. But I do feel like that's also sorely lacking.”

 

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“Difficult question for me because I am, I'm extremely happy where I'm at. You know, I've got a great personal life. I have a great family life. I've got three beautiful daughters that I absolutely adore. So, I would just go back and if I were telling myself one thing, I'll just say it'll be okay. Everything's going to be fine.”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“Currently on Audible, I'm reading, I think it's called 21 Tips for the 21st Century by Yuval Hariri, the gentleman that wrote Sapiens. On my Kindle, I'm reading Creating Climate Wealth by Jigar Shah.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“Nike says it best. Just do it and repeat and rinse and repeat. There is no stopping doing it. And I think if you want to improve your life and the lives of people around you, I think networking is almost a social obligation.”

 

You can get in contact with Raj at:

Email: raj@rajdaniels.com(link sends e-mail)

LinkedIn: Click Here

Nov 20, 2019

About Joey Mure & Russ Morgan

The wall street mindset separates both families, entrepreneurs, and business owners from their money while others use it for their advantage. The secret to freedom is having your money work for you, not someone else when wealth building. Both Russ and Joey work tirelessly to be the hub for financial insight and education for individuals, business owners and investors nationwide. They believe that taking control over your finances will lead to greater prosperity and a more stress-free way of life.

 

What made you decide to start a podcast?

Joey: “Our podcast came initially out of the thought of we want to have a weekly conversation with our clients.”

Russ: “It was a way to scale that part of our business because we were growing and growing and growing and realized, okay, we can no longer do this belly to belly, one-on-one. We have to do this one to many. And so, we just use the technology of a podcast.”

 

How has podcasting grown your social network?

Joey: “It's put us in a totally different category that we didn't expect. So, I guess the long story of it is that because we started talking to our clients every single week, we didn't realize that other people were listening in on the conversation. So, we've had people from all across the country calling us up, emailing us messages on Facebook…”

Russ: “We hit a thousand followers on our Facebook page. And for us, because we're not super social in that way because we, you know, I have four kids, Joey has five. We live in an age where, you know, be more on social media, but we don't spend tons of time there. We've had no strategy to try to gain followers or likes. But all of that has been a direct result of our podcasting and it's amazing that people are following to see or hear the latest episodes.”

 

What are your best practices for building a community within your brand?

Russ: “I would say obviously the podcasting has allowed us to have more engaged conversations with our clients to ask them ‘what are those things that you're really interested in?’ And sometimes when you survey your client base about different things, you get crickets. You know, you don't get a whole lot of feedback. But from our standpoint, because now we do have, as you said, kind of a loyal listenership. You can kind of track it.”

Joey: “They want more kind of engagement that's more than just a step into listening to a podcast. They want to meet other people like themselves. They want to go deeper into the Q and A with our podcast guests.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

Russ: “A long time ago, Joey and I had had the pleasure of being a part of this group that actually brought this speaker into Birmingham. He wrote a book and it was, it was actually written for real estate agents of all things, which neither Joey nor I were…”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

Joey: “I think for us, that's really where the community comes in. So, once we actually interview somebody on the podcast, they come into the community as an expert who's going to be doing a Q and A with our audience. And then they stay in the community and they are accessible almost as easily as like texting them because our community is on its own app platform.”

Russ: “Nobody likes to be in an environment where they feel like they're all alone. And I think that sometimes when you go to a traditional networking environment, you feel like ‘I'm on an Island’.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

Joey: “I would say take the leap, and for us, what I will say is this, if we really allowed the fear of getting started to stand in the way, it would've been a big flop and we would have never gotten started. But I think nowadays there are so many services out there that all you have to do is go in record good content and hand it off to somebody.”

Russ: “Sometimes the thought of starting your own can be a little overwhelming at first. And one of the best pieces of advice that we were given is to be on other people's podcasts.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

Russ: “I think we use digital networking to create personal networking. And what I mean by that is what we have developed some pretty amazing relationships because of our podcasts, but nothing stops belly to belly. Like when you can sit in a room with somebody and over dinner break bread, like that's where relationships go deep.”

Joey: “It's hard to say this, but I think that digital is just a much more efficient means of accomplishing the same goal. And it's been hard. It's been hard to transition.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

Joey: “Take the plunge…don't be afraid that you don't have anything to talk about. You always have something that you can add as far as value to the world.”

Russ: “The more you start to learn about people, the more you can interact and conversate with them on their level.”

 

You can get in contact with Joey and Russ at:

Website: www.wealthwithoutwallstreet.com

Apple Podcast: Click Here

Facebook: Click Here

Joey’s LinkedIn: Click Here

Russ’ LinkedIn: Click Here

Nov 18, 2019

About Brian T. Shirley

Brian T Shirley has performed all across the USA, Canada, the Bahamas, and Japan for over 25 years. Brian has also hosted 2 radio shows (The Triangle Comedy Radio Show, The BTS Radio Show) and currently hosts the BTS Entertainment Corner radio segment. This is a call-in segment featured on the "What's the Story?" radio show which originates out of Reno, NV. Brian can be seen in several short films, web series and the upcoming feature film "Mark of the Butterfly" in March 2020.

 

In your opinion, how has social media helped or hurt Independent Entertainment?

“it's helped a great deal because now you have outlets where you didn't before. If you make a short film or music video or even the independent music artists out there that doing a LP or a song, you have a chance to get it out there for the public now. And that's the good news and the bad news because, and I've been a victim of myself on this too, sometimes with Independence, you know, you get excited and you do a project and you get it out there and maybe it wasn't completely edited and put together the best. So, it's a double-edged sword.”

 

As you've evolved and matured, has it been hard to keep up with the latest social media trends?

“When we were starting the interview today, I couldn't even figure out how to get the audio working. It took me a few minutes. Because I think Zoom, I've done twice now. But you know, you either keep learning or you start declining and that's with anything.”

 

How important is networking to you and how has social media affected this?

“It's important to everybody. If you're in any kind of industry that requires, you know, having relationships with people, social media has allowed that to be sped up to a certain point because now you can meet people that you normally wouldn't, you know, in other states or countries or whatever, and you can bond with them somehow or some way online.”

“It's all about building relationships and social media's kind of sped that up a little bit.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“I'll share my favorite one, which I've actually worked into the stage act, believe it or not. Years ago, through being a radio, internet radio, a BTS radio show I hosted in ACE and we were in the studio. But it's internet radio. And I started putting together, you know, guests for the show, and one of the gentlemen that I reached out to, I forgot how I found these people to be honest; it was Brian Hayden and he is a heart transplant recipient. So, and he'd written a couple of books…”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“It's a learning process that I'm still learning. I don't think anybody, unless they become just an absolute pro, can be 100% perfect. You have to learn what you're posting. You know, what kind of a response it’s getting, you know, you can target your audience.

“I think staying positive no matter what you're doing is a big factor because when you start going into those dark areas, you just draw out so many dark, dark people.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“I think just staying visible, staying positive and getting content that, you know, people, if they're in this situation, here's what they're going to need. Making sure that's out there, I think is a good way to grow your business.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“I think both are equally important and if you use both to, you know, play on each other, that's the perfect storm because just like what happened with Brian, you know, I met him online, we networked and then we met each other in person.”

 

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“I would say don't party as much. When I started doing comedy particularly, you know, yeah, I had a little fun, but treat the business side of show business a little more serious…”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“something I've learned through really pursuing this acting thing is you look at where you need to go and start focusing that way, and sometimes it will come about, without you even knowing it. And it takes a year or two sometimes like it did with this, so, immediate success doesn't always happen. But if you continue, I think these things will come back around as long as you stay, you know, you persevere.”

 

You can get in contact with Brian at:

Website: www.briantshirley.com

Email: briantshirley@aol.com(link sends e-mail)

LinkedIn: Click Here

Twitter: Click Here

Nov 13, 2019

About Molly Dill

Molly Dill is the director of gBETA Milwaukee at gener8tor. She joined gener8tor after a nine-year journalism career. Molly most recently served as managing editor of BizTimes Milwaukee, a bi-weekly regional business magazine where she also covered the Milwaukee startups, technology, and financial services beats. Molly previously was a reporter at the Marshfield News-Herald in Marshfield, Wisconsin. An Illinois native, she earned a bachelor's in journalism from Marquette University.

 

Why did you switch from journalism to startups?

“I had been covering startups for the last two years at BizTimes and I had been at BizTimes about eight years and rose to managing editor there. I felt that I kind of had plateaued and I needed a new challenge in my career and since I was covering startups and I had developed a lot of contacts in the startup world, it was kind of a natural evolution actually as a result of networking.”

 

What is gBETA Milwaukee?

“gBETA Milwaukee is a program of gener8tor. So, just to kind of give you an overview of gener8tor, it's a startup accelerator that was started in 2012. Joe Kirgues and Troy Vosseller are two of the co-founders who are still active today…we do take an ownership stake in return for a hundred-thousand-dollar investment and we only accept five startups per program.”

 

If a startup founder wants to apply to gBETA Milwaukee, what’s the best way to go about that?

“They can contact me. My email is molly@gener8tor.com(link sends e-mail) as generator with an eight. And we have a website gbetastartups.com. There's different city pages on there. Our fall program began October 24th and that goes through December 13th and then we'll take a little bit of a winter break and begin again in the spring.”

“We're looking for startups that are highly unique and highly scalable, and they must be based in greater Milwaukee for my program. So, it's not so much the main street businesses like a barbershop or a restaurant. It's more really original solutions to problems that others haven't come up with before or that are filling a need or a niche or are uniquely different.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“my first job was at the Marshfield News-Herald in Marshfield, which is in Marshfield, Wisconsin like you mentioned. And then I wanted to get back to Milwaukee. I went to Marquette and I really loved Milwaukee. I wanted to be here and so I had kept in touch with a mentor from that, from my internship during college. And this mentor, Julie, she kept me in mind…”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“several times per week, I try to meet various contacts for coffee, for drinks, whatever, just to make sure that we're keeping in touch and I know what's going on with them and they know what's going on with me and how we might be able to help each other or work together. So, I think a good networking interaction is a kind of give and take.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“go to a networking event in your industry that, you know, you'll want to meet people at and then just strike up conversations. It's really hard at first, but the more you go, the more everyone in the room isn't a stranger anymore. And these are some people you've met before and you can just pick up where you left off. So, I would say kind of forcing yourself to get out there and meet new people can help you so much.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“I like traditional networking. Digital networking, I think can be kind of a companion, but traditional in person, that's way more memorable than someone connecting with you on LinkedIn.”

 

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“I think I was a little hesitant at first to ask for help in building my network and advancing my career. And so, I would just kind of push myself to ask people to connect me to other people.”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“when it comes to founders, I would love to meet the founders of Airbnb because I remember my initial reaction to Airbnb being just completely appalled. Like, why would you go stay in someone's house, particularly if that person is still there, like just in their spare bedroom that you've never met before and how they overcame that challenge.”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“I'm currently reading The Lean Startup by Eric Ries. So, like we said, I'm relatively new to my role at gener8tor and I'm trying to learn as much as I can about the models that they find to be most effective. So, like they have an internal model, but a lot of it is based on The Lean Startup.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“I would say just be outgoing. Try not to be too shy and just ask for what you need from your network, and you like try to be helpful to your network as well so it's that mutually beneficial relationship.”

 

You can get in contact with Molly at:

Email: molly@gener8tor.com(link sends e-mail)

Website: www.gbetastartups.com

LinkedIn: Click Here

Twitter: Click Here

Nov 11, 2019

About Derrick Van Mell

Derrick is the CEO of The Center for Management Terms & Practices, the standards body for general management. Founded in 2018 after a successful pilot with the SBA, it is a for-profit association that trains managers at every level from every sector in size. The Center standardize the terminology of management so departments can communicate. It standardized a kit of one-page tools so people can collaborate efficiently. Information about training and events is at theindex.net. 

 

What's changed in your world since the last time we chatted/recorded?

“Well, my professional world, it's changed quite a bit really; giving up a consulting practice of 25 years, evolved it, evolved it a lot, I think it's fair to say into The Center. And one of the most common problems I saw when I was doing work with people, managers of all organizations at all levels was what I called a dodgeball meeting.”

 

Let's dive deeper into your business. Who do you primarily work with?

“We work with people who have general management responsibilities. So, those are people, and we have lots of terminology for this, who connect the dots to see the big picture, who have P and L responsibility, who are on the management track…”

 

What's the value-add they will get by working with you?

“The value add is really this fundamental point that if people don't really understand the common language of management, it's really not the words. It's really the concepts. That's what words are really.”

 

How can you be a resource to your network and mine?

“it's not just a way to optimize performance, it's a way to break down, you know, fundamental social barriers too. People love to work. It's important to them. And um, you know, you can't really treat people fairly unless you can understand them clearly.”

 

Paying it forward is an overarching theme that we hear and see often in the business world. Please share a recent pay-it-forward experience that you've had... Received or given.

“the center has been formally organized for a year and we're starting to develop, and we have developed our core installers and CEO soon, and senior managers from different departments and they've gotten to know each other which is great. So, I gathered them together yesterday to think about ‘how are we going to organize our first chapter’ because we have to build community, personal community, among our membership.”

 

Everyone loves a good tip or tool/resource that will help save them time or make their life easier. Do you have any tips or resources to share with our listeners?

“we're proud of The Index. If you want to take a little step further, you're going into a meeting and you know, it's about some management topic, you know, market research, workflow process, writing the employee manual, you know, financial accounting, whatever it is. You know, go to The Index and you'll see the General Managers Index.”

 

If we could remove all barriers and constraints what project would you do or take on? (this could be personal or professional)

“my vision of success is an international conference. People from different regions, different languages, literally different languages, people from across difficult, you know, political and cultural borders sharing ideas about management. It's not just a universal language, it's a universal activity.”

 

You can get in contact with Derrick at:

Phone: 608-260-9300

Website: www.theindex.net

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/derrickvanmell

Nov 6, 2019

About Brian Lee

Brian Lee, APR, is the president of Revelation PR, Advertising & Social Media, as well as a part-time lecturer on social media at Madison Area Technical College. Business Magazine named Brian to its "40 Under 40" list in 2012, and PRSA-Madison named him its 2013 Communicator of the Year. Outside of Revelation, Brian is the editor-in-chief of Madison Startups, an online publication that covers startup news in town, and he runs EatDrinkMadison.com, a Madison, Wisconsin, restaurant and bar guide that is searchable by amenities.

 

Let’s discuss reputation and crisis management.

“it has become more important lately, especially with social media speeding up the news cycle that something that you could let sort of hide or fester in the old days gets really exposed very quickly these days.

 

Tell us the difference between reputation and crisis management.

“reputation management is everything you do basically before an incident occurs, you are [inaudible] doing reputation management to help maintain and protect your brand, shape, perceptions, and provide crisis resiliency. Meanwhile, crisis management or crisis communications is everything that occurs after an incident happens. So, this is your doing crisis management to help restore your rebuild trust and reestablish a reputation.”

 

Why is having a good reputation important?

“when you have a good reputation, people are more likely to forgive you after an incident because it's out of character and the vice versa is true. Then there's the business case. A Deloitte study shows that when an organization's reputation is damaged, there's a decrease in revenue, customer's brand value and/or stock price. In fact, uh, some number, like 87% of CEOs worldwide said reputation risk is the most important strategic risk their organizations are facing.”

 

When talking about reputation management, what are some of the first things, first steps that a business or organization should look at?

“think about it like a campaign. And with any campaign, it's important to start with your goals. So, in this case, list your business goals first and then come up with corresponding reputation goals.”

 

Say something happens at your company that's really positioning you in a negative way. How is your organization going to recover from that?

“The first thing I tell people in companies is that you need to talk to all your internal audiences first. That might be staff, volunteers, board of directors, et cetera. They need to know what's going on, what the company's doing. It also helps improve morale. And it kills the rumor mill.”

 

Do you have a case study that you could share with us?

“it's a little old, but people know it, it's United Airlines, and this occurred back in 2017. And just to remind listeners out there is that United Airlines had a flight that was oversold. They needed to put on their own crew members. So, they asked for volunteers. Finally, they had to actually forcibly remove a passenger…”

 

What's changed in your world since the last time we chatted/recorded?

“I launched the corporate event planning business called the revelation events and I was also just named an entrepreneur in residence at Madison area technical college.”

 

Let's dive deeper into your business. Who do you primarily work with?

“Revelation: We primarily work with hospitality clients, realtors, developers, associations, tech, and B2B companies. And although our clients do span the state and the country, our main specialty is helping clients win Madison.”

 

How can you be a resource to your network and mine?

“one of the things you mentioned in the introductions, I am also the editor in chief of a newspaper here in Madison. We cover all the startups and tech and biotech and so forth going on. It's been interesting because there's been a lot of communities in the Midwest that sort of want to replicate what Madison has in terms of an entrepreneurial ecosystem. So, for example…”

 

In our initial interview - you had said you'd like to connect with decision-makers in companies. Have you made progress on connecting with any particular person?

“at some point, I did reach out to that person and I just think of a parallel example that earlier this year I was pursuing another business opportunity for Revelation. I have several mutual connections to help reach out on my behalf, but they didn't have any luck. So finally, I'm like, okay, I just gotta take matters into my own hands. I reached out myself and I did get a meeting of it.”

 

Paying it forward is an overarching theme that we hear and see often in the business world. Please share a recent pay-it-forward experience that you've had... Received or given.

“in that previous interview, I mentioned I often refer business to someone. I don't expect that quid pro quo. So, one time I was at this networking event and I met one person who was looking to buy a particular service and another person I met at that same networking event who actually provided that service. So, it was getting toward the end of the night and I realized, I bet they're not going to even meet because they're about to leave. So, I made sure to grab both of them and introduced them, and they actually ended up doing business together.”

 

Everyone loves a good tip or tool/resource that will help save them time or make their life easier. Do you have any tips or resources to share with our listeners?

“I really like using OneNote. I use it to keep notes for all my different businesses and I also keep a set of personal notes. So, I do everything from vacation planning to save recipes, to writing outlines of blog posts on it. And I like being able to access the same notes from any device wherever I am.”

 

If we could remove all barriers and constraints what project would you do or take on? (this could be personal or professional)

“I would love to write a movie script or at least finish the one I started so many years ago and then shop it around Hollywood. I also wrote a TV pilot script years ago. It didn't get picked up obviously, but I would retool and shop that around too.”

 

You can get in contact with Brian at:

Email: brian@revalation.agency(link sends e-mail)

Website: https://revelation.agency/

LinkedIn: Click Here

Nov 4, 2019

About Deanna Singh

Deanna Singh, the author of Purposeful Hustle, wants to live in a world where marginalized communities have power. As an expert social entrepreneur, she is obsessed with making the world a better place and she will build or break systems to create positive change. Deanna is described as a trailblazer and dynamic speaker who is at the forefront of social change. She is an accomplished author, educator, business leader, and social justice champion!

 

Please share more about your book, Purposeful Hustle and why networking is important to Purposeful Hustlers.

“the first half of the book, we really talk about purpose. And the idea there, you know, people throw around these words, but when I talk about purpose, I mean what are you uniquely positioned to do in the world? So, what is it that you can accomplish that really nobody else can?”

 

How does a Purposeful Hustler prepare for a meeting?

“a lot of times, we have these amazing people in our network and we get a meeting with them and we're so excited and then we get to the meeting and it flops, because we haven't taken the time to prepare in advance and really think through what would be the most effective use of their time…”

 

What are some of the best questions you have been asked when people are trying to network with you?

“my all-time favorite question is what should I have asked that I didn't ask? You know, is there anything that you think I should know that might not be on my radar?”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“one of the things I decided to do was have two o'clock tea on Tuesdays. Now I don't think I ever ended up having any of the meetings happen that way where it was actually Tuesday. Sometimes it was Thursday or Wednesday morning or whether, you know, I think probably less than 5% of them ended up to being Tuesday at two o'clock but the idea was I was going to try and reach out to 52 people, so one a week at least minimally that were not part of my network that I thought would be really good and my network.”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“one of the things that I've been working on is trying to use the tools that already exist out there to really continue to nurture the relationship. And obviously one of the biggest kinds of tools that we have at our disposal now is social media. So, just making sure that I'm posting content that I think is relevant to my network…”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“It really comes down to being strategic. You know, a lot of times I'll have people in, they'll say I'm going to a networking event and I'll say, that's great. Like, who are you hoping to meet? They’re like, I don't know.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“I will say what I have found to be incredible, and this has really been over the last year and I think I started as sort of a naysayer with this and now have completely changed my tune, is the ability to be able to use, kind of blend the two, right, through video conferencing.”

 

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“One of the things that I would definitely really stress is the ability to collect and keep clean my CRM (customer relationship management system).”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with, and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“the one that would be for me super exciting would be Michelle Obama. And I do think that I could probably connect in less than six degrees of separation. But it's one of those things where like where we started this conversation about, well, what would you ask? And you know, what would that mean and what would I be able to bring to the table?”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“When I was in college, I sort of made it like a game, right? Where I would try and find the most intimidating person in the room for whatever reason, whatever room I was in. And then I made it a point to try and go up to that person and just speak to them. And I think that like one of the things that I always tell people is I get it. I understand that you're nervous, but the thing that will help you get over your nerves is practicing, right? And pushing yourself out of your comfort zone.”

 

You can get in contact with Deanna at:

Website: www.deannasingh.com

LinkedIn: Click Here

Oct 30, 2019

About Christie Ruffino

Christie Ruffino is a serial entrepreneur who has had a very purposeful journey since she started building her business tribe over 10 years ago. It has all come together in a way that now serves her clients at the highest level. From her first entrepreneurial effort as the Top Girl Scout Cookie Seller to her current business as the President of the Dynamic Professional Women’s Network, Inc., Christie has learned how to guide other entrepreneurs to get groundbreaking results as a business strategy coach.

 

What's changed in your world since the last time we chatted/recorded?

“I guess the piece that's changed is because technology is changing so much. We've adapted to create opportunities for people to connect and for our community to build virtually. I remember at first in the beginning years doing a webinar or doing some kind of a conference call. It was difficult, and now it's so easy…”

 

Let's dive deeper into your business. Who do you primarily work with?

“We are an industry exclusive leads group. That's kind of what we've been for the last 15 years. It's typically business to consumer type of opportunities, a little bit of business to business…A couple things that make us different is, of course, we're all women. And then a few things about how we work make it a little bit more conducive to working women.”

 

How can you be a resource to your network and mine?

“We have the different chapters that meet. So, that's really about supporting them on the ground level. We do events occasionally. It's been hard to do local events, you know, in specific locations. We do a lot of them, but it's not necessarily attractive to everybody based on where they're located. And so, we've been kind of transitioning to do virtual events.”

“We have a training library that we've developed and we're continuing to add more teaching into that.”

 

Who is it that you’re looking to network with?

“specifically, women who are looking to kind of realize that their business is more than the company that they're with and the products that they sell. It's more about who they are as an individual and the experience that they bring to the table, as well as their story. And so, for the last eight years, I've been helping women position their stories to build a stronger personal brand.”

 

Paying it forward is an overarching theme that we hear and see often in the business world. Please share a recent pay-it-forward experience that you've had... Received or given.

“I honestly think when in the networking world, like I'm constantly making connections for people. People are constantly making connections for me. I know a lot of the people I hire are former clients…I mean there's a lot of pay it forward I do in my life...”

 

Everyone loves a good tip or tool/resource that will help save them time or make their life easier. Do you have any tips or resources to share with our listeners?

“Grammarly. Oh my gosh. So, if you've not used Grammarly, I never thought I needed Grammarly because, I don’t know, I sent my stuff to an editor. I didn't think I needed it. But you can download Grammarly to your computer and it fixes everything. With a Facebook post, with an email you're sending, with your website updates, like it basically connects to your PC and will suggest whatever you need to do to fix your stuff.”

 

If we could remove all barriers and constraints what project would you do or take on? (this could be personal or professional)

“Right now, it's doing my own podcast…people want to consume information. They want to continually, not everybody, but people in the personal development space, we want to keep filling our brains with good information and good direction and good resources from people that remember the resources like they're supposed to.”

 

You can get in contact with Christie at:

Website: www.christieruffino.com

Website: www.ourdpwn.com

LinkedIn: Click Here

Oct 28, 2019

About Martha

Martha Carrigan is the President & CEO of Big Shoes Network (BSN): a family of niche job boards and resources serving the Midwest and Southeast. Big Shoes Network specializes in advertising, digital and traditional communication, graphic and web design, marketing, public relations, and social media industries. Martha is responsible for business development, strategic marketing, and financial management.

 

What's changed in your world since the last time we chatted/recorded?

“Well, my world consists of my work personally and then the industry. And so as far as Big Shoes Network goes, what's changed with that is we've added, sort of under the current consulting arm, called Next Steps because we had been doing so much personal branding and some professional branding…”

 

Let's dive deeper into your business. Who do you primarily work with?

“one Avenue for our target customer, our folks that are seekers or not seekers, but potentially great employees or talent. Where we generate our money from is from clients posting jobs and adding ads on our site. So that client, we have about 40% of our business is agency, 50% is corporate and 10% is nonprofit and government. And I define that a little differently because although for example, the University of Wisconsin is one of our largest clients and they are nonprofit, but they have more of a corporate sort of feel and size and all of that. So, we lump them in with the corporate. Um, yeah. So, we have about 4,000 clients and we've posted well over 10,000 jobs in our history.”

 

What's the value-add they will get by working with you?

“We are very customer service and high touch. That's our culture. We love helping. We will bend over backwards for you.”

 

How can you be a resource to your network and mine?

“We really love, like I said, helping people. We get a fair number of clients that will post, and we'll circle back to them and say, perhaps you can modify this a bit in order to get a better response. Additionally, when you are utilizing a larger organization, if you want to do some adjusting, tweaking, extending, that's really not an option. But with us, it really is…”

 

In our initial interview - you had said you'd like to connect with Denzel Washington or Bill Gates. Have you made progress on connecting with them?

“I've connected with Denzel in my dreams, and I have not yet connected with Bill Gates. I'm working my way up the ladder. I just had a conversation with Michael Moni, UWM’s Chancellor. And the CEO of Microsoft now is a UWM grad.”

 

Paying it forward is an overarching theme that we hear and see often in the business world. Please share a recent pay-it-forward experience that you've had... Received or given.

(Discussing a recent experience at a grocery store) “You can only pay with credit card. And I've seen that more and more and I get it. It's fast, it's reliable. But this woman didn't have a credit card and a lot of people don't, or they opt not to use it for various reasons. So, she got back in line into the line next to mine, got to the front of the line and the woman said it was for credit card only. We're talking an hour later. So, she got in line behind me and I just, I could hardly talk. I was so upset. She was fine with it. I'm like, this is not fair. So, she and I struck up a conversation and then as I was leaving, I'm like, no. So, I went back, and I swiped my card and I was like, this is for her and whatever she's buying.”

 

Everyone loves a good tip or tool/resource that will help save them time or make their life easier. Do you have any tips or resources to share with our listeners?

“one of those is we have a business directory. So, if a client comes to us and says, Hey, I need a website built. I don't want to hire an employee necessarily to do that. It's just a project or it's a, you know, a one-year thing. I'll send them to our business directory and say, go look on the web developer site, and Keystone click is in there…”

 

If we could remove all barriers and constraints what project would you do or take on? (this could be personal or professional)

“I'd really like to learn Spanish. I would love to just for the fun of it. I love the language, but secondly, I'd like to be useful in underserved markets. I've always wanted to volunteer for, for example, Red Cross Disaster Relief because I'm super good at organizing, but I just don't think it would have much value unless I spoke a different language.”

 

You can get in contact with Martha at:

Phone: 414-962-4222

Email: martha@bigshoesnetwork.com(link sends e-mail)

Website: www.bigshoesnetwork.com

LinkedIn: Click Here

Oct 23, 2019

About Paul M. Neuberger

Paul M. Neuberger believes in making the impossible possible.  A masterful speaker and trainer, he challenges people to dig deep and discover talents they never knew they had. Whether it’s working hands-on with small teams or presenting in front of hundreds of people, Paul is adept at truly connecting with his audience and getting to the heart of important issues. He has worked with leading organizations around the world to help improve effectiveness, performance and cultivate a stronger sense of passion in the workplace.

A sales expert, Paul is known to many organizations as The Cold Call Coach. He has taught thousands of students in more than a hundred countries through his Cold Call University program, helping sales professionals in a range of industries close more business in less time than ever before.

Paul serves as President of The Starr Group, a trusted leader in the insurance field and is one of the largest family-owned, independent insurance agencies in Wisconsin. He is also the Chairman of the 2019 American Heart Association Milwaukee Heart Walk. Lastly, Paul is the Founder of C-Suite for Christ; a group of business executives who share stories of how including Christ in our daily lives has positively affected our work environment.

 

What drives you? Where do you find the motivation to do what you do?

“I'm just drawn to the slogan ‘making the impossible possible’ because it's only impossible until somebody does it for the very first time. If you want to get the most out of me, if you want to get me to dig deep and accomplish something that never has been done before by anybody, just tell me it can't be done and then watch me.”

 

What is your #1 secret to cold call success?

“I would say the number one tip that I can give for cold calling success is it's all about value. And how I define value is something that you can offer.”

 

You've accomplished so much as an entrepreneur in your young career. What's next for you?

“I look at life as a bicycle. I am peddling as fast as I can. I am providing the horsepower to make sure that that bike can go from point A to point B, but God's got the handlebars. So, I don't know what direction I'm heading unnecessarily.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“I would say probably when I was a financial advisor with Thrivent Financial, one of the things that I teach, this in my keynotes, I teach this in my cold call training, you have to be incredibly strategic when you sell. Cold calling is not a numbers game. It is quality over quantity…”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“It's really about two things, calendar and delegation. If I'm not on top of my calendar and delegation, I'm in big trouble.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“Value. I’ve got to keep coming back to it. I believe in life, you reap what you sow, and I believe in life, before you can get, you have to give.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“That's like asking me to pick peanut butter or jelly. What a tough question. Well, I know where you're going, but I would have to say both.”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with, and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“I would say the first person that comes to my mind is Simon Sinek. And the reason I talk about Simon Sinek is I owe Simon Sinek a tremendous debt of gratitude. When I was a financial advisor, just getting started in that career…”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“You only live once. Make it happen, and if you fall short of the mark, get back up and try it again. But don't live with regrets…”

 

You can get in contact with Paul at:

Website: www.paulmneuberger.com

Email: paul@paulmneuberger.com(link sends e-mail)

LinkedIn: Click Here

Twitter: Click Here

Oct 21, 2019

About Veronica Hinke

Veronica Hinke has been researching the Titanic for as long as she can remember. She has interviewed hundreds of experts on lifestyles, foods, and drinks for Tribune Media and maintains close working relationships with leading chefs and mixologists around the world. Her report, “Titanic Cocktails,” appeared in Wine Enthusiast magazine, honoring the hundredth anniversary of the Titanic, and was blogged by the Village Voice. Ms. Hinke currently resides just outside of Chicago, Illinois.

 

Why did you write your book "The Last Night on the Titanic: Unsinkable Drinking, Dining & Style"?

“I really wanted to honor the 100th anniversary year of the sinking of the Titanic, which was in 2012. The anniversary year was in 2012 and so I spent pretty much the whole year prior, 2011, really researching to find a hook.”

 

What do you hope readers will take away from reading your book?

“I want people to be inspired by these people. Every story that I told had a purpose, kept me going, and it really kept me going through some of the darkest days in my life.”

 

Is it a cookbook? What is a culinary narrative?

“pretty much it's a narrative with some recipes sprinkled throughout. And I really curated those recipes to be purposeful where they were located. I strategically put them in spots.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“I organized a party for the book, and I didn't want to just have a book party. I want to do something really special. And this was specifically for the press.”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“Social media really has helped. And as even though I mentioned earlier that it's so much nicer to get together in person, I think that's still important, but I'm a huge fan of Facebook and Instagram.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“Why not share your network? You know, I mean, some people might be concerned about duplication. Hey, if it's duplicated, they'll get the message twice or maybe three times. I think that's a lot less of a problem than someone being isolated from, you know, being able to work towards their goals.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“I love in person. It's my own personal preference. I would rather be sitting with you right now talking face to face obviously. But then, I love that this opportunity is there because of the technology.”

 

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“Well, I would say I wouldn't change a thing. I'm so happy about what I did because that's the secret I think is you have to believe that. And I think the one thing I would say is make the most of every minute and still have that balance that you need to have to live a decent life. But I think the older you get, the more people you lose, and you start to realize the fragility of life and you think you have forever and you don't, you really don't.

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“Well, and I'm glad you mentioned someone that's no longer here because the person that I would love to sit down and have lunch with or have a cup of coffee with or tea is Julia Child.”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“right now, I'm reading a lovely little book and it's by John Steinbeck and it's Of Mice and Men.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“one piece of advice I try to remember is that it takes 30 days to make a habit. And that's not that long, Lori. You know, it's like if you really stick your nose to the grindstone, you can come up with a new habit in 30 days and so think of a new habit that you would like to instill in your life and make it happen.”

 

You can get in contact with Veronica at:

LinkedIn: Click Here

Instagram: Click Here

Twitter: Click Here

Oct 16, 2019

About Kay Edwards

Kay Edwards is the founder of Outsight Network an association of senior-level consultants that serve mission-driven organizations. The mission of Outsight is to build lasting relationships and be relentlessly helpful. Kay helps her clients ask better questions so they can understand their organizations, their customers, and their marketplace, and turn that understanding into strategies that create life-long customers.

 

How do you define great business relationships?

“I think a business relationship really puts the other person at the center without losing sight of what you want and need from the relationship.”

 

What is the greatest barrier to building great business relationships?

“I think there are two kinds of people in the world. There are people who really instinctively know how to build relationships and they do it really well but don't often understand the process. And then there are people like me who don't do it instinctively and there's a little bit of fear.”

 

What can leaders do to overcome barriers in building relationships?

“one of the things is to be really intentional about it and even if it comes naturally to you to understand who are you building relationships with? Why? What do you want from the relationships? How do you make that work?”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“actually, a client located in Europe. We were helping them build relationships in the U.S. It was a nonprofit organization, so they had as their cause helping emerging democracies around the world. And through some networking connections, I found myself having breakfast with the owner of the San Francisco Giants.”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“always make sure we schedule the next connection. Always make sure I know what I'm going to talk with next about someone, and always understand how am I adding value to this relationship.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“Well again, be intentional. But the other thing that I've learned that works really well when I first started my firm about 20 years ago, there was a rule that I created that said, ‘I never walk out of a meeting without asking for someone else I should meet’.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“I really like face to face, but I understand that digital has its role as well. I look at them as tools and in some situations digital is more appropriate and in some situations, face-to-face is more appropriate.”

 

If you could go back 20 years, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“I had to write down every single word I was going to say on the phone because I was so introverted and so scared of picking up the phone and so afraid of what the person on the other end would say…”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with, and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“So, when I was doing my MBA, this actually was a project of ours, we were assigned the task of identifying a leader that we admired and reaching out to them and interviewing them and writing a paper on it. Well, this was the time when right after Mel Gibson had produced…”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“I am rereading the book, The Dip by Seth Godin. who's one of my favorite authors.

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“Just do it. Just make time on your calendar.”

 

You can get in contact with Kay at:

Website: www.outsightnetwork.com

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kay-edwards-77a501

Oct 14, 2019

About John Waid

John is the founder and CEO of C3 corporate culture consulting, a firm specializing in aligning an organization's culture with its strategic goals. John has worked in sales and marketing at Pfizer, Pepsi Company, Nestle and Chateau St. Michelle winery. During these experiences, he developed a heightened awareness of the indispensable role people's attitudes play in implementing effective processes and procedures. John is an author, speaker, facilitator, and thought leader in the area of corporate culture and its positive impact on people and companies. He was born in Mexico City, has lived in five countries and speaks fluent Spanish, Portuguese and English. He is an author, keynote speaker, blogger, soccer fan, wine enthusiast, and proud dad. He currently makes his home in Atlanta.

 

Why does culture matter and what is the definition of corporate culture?

“Culture is basically some values and some behaviors that you stand for. Most companies have made an effort to define their culture through selecting some values and then also some behaviors to go with those values…”

 

How easy or hard is it to implement great company culture?

“The biggest barrier to implementing culture is self-awareness. And self-awareness is a topic that’s uh…90% of people think they're self-aware, only about 10% of people are.”

 

How much does company culture contribute to results, profits, and all other variables?

“How much more do you think that Chick-fil-A sells versus a Kentucky Fried Chicken?... 500% more. Yes. Because of the experience, because of the people.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“I met a person who wrote a book called The Platinum Rule and he was from New York, he lives in San Diego, and what he found out is that the golden rule ‘do unto others as you would have them do unto you’, wasn't working for him…”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“Don't be shy. Get out there. Say hello and start with hello. Care about the other person. Use the platinum rule. And you know, build a relationship to the point where they want to buy from you. Because at the end of the day, we don't sell anything, people buy.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“Digital's a good way to get to see how people remember you that you've met before. I often find when I send out things digitally that people that I haven't talked to in a while, will reach back around and say, ‘Hey John, haven't heard from you. I got this email from you; I got this material from you…”

 

If you could go back 20 years, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“I would've gone to Wharton and studied international business because I've could've gotten in there as an MBA. I would have found my calling, you know, which is training and development and the area of culture earlier in life so that I could have devoted more time to it.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“Be good to people. Figure out what your calling is.”

 

You can get in contact with John at:

Phone: 404-915-3051

Email: jwaid@corporatecultureconsulting.com(link sends e-mail)

Website: www.c3culture.com

LinkedIn: Click Here

Oct 9, 2019

About Anna Koeck

Born in communist Russia, Dr. Anna Koeck emigrated to the US at the age of 10 with her single mom Rimma. With hard work and perseverance, Dr. Koeck received a triple business degree from UW Madison, managed multi-million-dollar software projects at Epic Systems and graduated Magna Cum Laude from ICO with her Doctor of Optometry Degree. To help the entire world see clearly at a transparent price, she opened Theia Vision Care and within the first year was voted the top doctor in Lake Country, WI.

 

Why do you do what you do?

“I come from a very different country. I'm an immigrant and I watched my mom work really hard to bring me to this country and to get me where I'm at. And my mom is definitely an inspiration. She's a role model.”

 

When should your child get a first eye exam?

“6 to 18 months should be their first eye exam. And that tends to surprise people.”

 

What is Direct Medical Care and Theia Concierge Care, and why is it right for me?

“In a nutshell, the direct care is the idea of I'm directly seeing you and there's not an intermediary third party involved, be it insurance, vision plan, or other pieces. By eliminating steps, I'm eliminating time and money spent on that so I can now spend the time in my chair with you and ask you extra questions and get your kids in. And because I save money, I pass that on to you as well in the product and services.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“Just a random event running off a couple of years ago to a vision expo in New York. And I was flying out of Milwaukee right here. And typically there's not a long line to get into the airport, but that particular morning, for whatever reason, I don't know if it was spring break or what was going on, this long, long line…”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“Continuing to put yourself out there and making the time. So, there's always a conversation about time management, and how do you do everything? You don't. You put things on your schedule and you make something a priority. And if you do that, it’ll happen.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“Put yourself out there. So, it's always, you know, some of these cliches, but they're kind of cliche for a reason, right? You get growth out of being uncomfortable.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“I'm still thinking about that question as well. I mean, a little bit of a balance.”

 

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“That's really interesting to kind of go back in time. What if I could change anything? And the more I thought about it, the more I kind of embraced the overall, ‘you're exactly where you're supposed to be’. And I firmly believe that.”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“The professional answer would probably be Oprah and there are ways to, you know, reach out on her. There's an email account. You know, I went to graduate school in Chicago, her studios were down there. So, I think it's possible.”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“I just finished I am Malala. And she is a huge activist for education, children's education and particularly girl’s education, grew up in Pakistan and through a variety of things that have happened, I think she now lives in England.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“There's a code that says, ‘there is no way to happiness, happiness is the way’ and replace happiness with anything else. So, you just do it, you find an event and you go to it or…you just kind of continue to do the things that you're looking to achieve and hopefully eventually you get there.”

 

 

You can get in contact with Dr. Anna Koeck at:

Office Phone: 262-361-0022

Website: www.theiavisioncare.com

LinkedIn: Click Here

Oct 7, 2019

About Lisa Danforth

Lisa Danforth is a business strategist and firm believer that business doesn’t have to be so hard. She helps women navigate obstacles & struggles that are specific to women in business so they can create the impact & income they desire with less overwhelm & more joy.

 

How important are boundaries in business?

“I think of boundaries as the bridge to whatever success that it is that you're looking for. And if we don't have boundaries in place…”

 

What is the double-bind for women and how does it get in the way of their success, personally and professionally?

“The double-bind for women is a well-known phenomenon that women are either perceived as warm or competent but rarely both.”

 

What’s the best way to achieve work-life balance?

“I actually don't believe in work-life balance. I'm going to be totally honest with you. I don't think that we want everything in our lives to be weighed out evenly.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“I would have to say it is with a woman that I met online, sort of peripheral. There was a group of people that I spent time with, but there was a woman on the periphery, two layers out, right, and we kept sort of bumping into each other and talking, talking, talking, you know, just sort of bumping into the groups. And she finally reached, she reached out because she is in social media. We set up a conversation to chat and we have over the years become best friends…”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“There's a couple of things that really come to mind and the first one is being intentional. I think we need to be more intentional in anything that we do and who we are in order to be more effective…”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“Be very intentional about what you're looking for. What will support you? How can you support other people?”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“For me, it's hand down traditional. I don't know if it's just because of my age. I'm 54. I can jump into a conversation and not rudely like ‘Hey, what are you doing?’ Really just sort of ease into a conversation.”

 

If you could go back 20 years, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“I would say two things. One, relax. Rubbing a square peg in a round hole is not going to work, right? I mean, I refer to it as the white-knuckled grip. It's just ‘push, push, push, push’. Which, may I say, was how I was trained in business. It's a very masculine, dominant push energy, ‘go, go, go’. The more I have relaxed and leaned into my feminine energy and how I do business, my businesses have flourished.”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“One of the women that I've been following, and I adore her because she is strong, confident, brilliant, puts herself out there and takes no bull from anyone. But is all of service in the work that she does. The name is Nilofer Merchant. She wrote a book called, um, what is it...The Power of Onlyness.”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“It’s called Psycho-Cybernetics. It is all about the mind and focusing on what is working for us and not re-living our past, moving into the future through our thoughts and behaviors of the past. Not allowing them to control what we do in the future.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“Just be very intentional on the business that you want, the life that you want, the relationships that you're looking to build.”

 

You can get in contact with Lisa at:

Email: lisa@lisadanforth.com(link sends e-mail)

Website: Click Here

LinkedIn: Click Here

Oct 2, 2019

About Neille Hoffman:

Neille Hoffman is a creative innovator and entrepreneur dedicated to the craft of design. With over 20 years of branding expertise, she has created integrated communication solutions for long term clients across a spectrum of industries including; healthcare, education, entertainment, luxury goods, and real estate. As a coach, consultant, speaker, and recovering perfectionist, she has the unique ability to recognize the gifts others don’t see in themselves and empower them to follow their dreams.

 

Why is branding more important than ever?

“I believe branding is more important than ever because our world is so connected with our whole digital age. We can know people down the block, but we can also know people across the world. And we really need to have some differentiation.”

 

What is the difference between branding and personal branding?

“There's a fine line, I think. I think that personal branding is really who your genuine self is. So I don't really think you can manufacture a personal brand. Some people think that they can change the way they dress or they can talk different or you know, they can kind of create who they want people to see them as…”

 

Where do you begin when you are creating a brand?

“I always like to dive deep with questions and research. I think a lot of, at least for personal branding and for business branding as well, we have to take a look at our mindset and our limited beliefs…”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had? How was the connection made? What was the outcome of the connection?

“My favorite networking experience that I have had here in Milwaukee was meeting Sara Meaney, Sara Meaney and I both had our own businesses at the time. Hers was Comet Branding and mine was Aurum Design and we were both moving into a new building actually across the street from here in the Third Ward. And we just happened to be throwing our open house parties on the same night.”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“I make a very pointed effort to reach out to friends and check in on them, see what is going on with their lives, get updates from people, schedule coffees, and really have a genuine interest in the people that I have met.”

 

What advice would you offer to the business professional who is looking to grow their network?

“The number one thing I would say is take action. I think for far too long I stayed on the sidelines.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking- which do you find more value in? Please explain.

“Right now, I don't want to say I want to find more value in it, but I want to say I'm stepping into it. So again, outside of my comfort zone is the digital networking. So I have recently become part of an entrepreneurial networking group online and it's people from all over the world. And what I like about that is you're actually connecting with people who think like you do and are so supportive. It's crazy.”

 

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more of/less of/differently with regards to your professional career?

“I would tell myself to trust my instincts more. I think I in the past have deferred to other people's opinions.”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree? How would you start that journey?

“So, I think I have a little bit of a different answer for this one. I could think of, you know, a handful of people that I would like to say, but this is going to be a little out there. I would like to connect with my future self. And I would hope that there are at least six people I have yet to meet who are going to help me grow into that future self.

 

What book are you reading right now?

“So, every year, and I think you've probably got this answer before, I read the Alchemist. So, I'd finished that actually not too long ago…”

 

Any final word of advice to offer our listeners with regards to growing and supporting your network?

“I would just say to make genuine connections and always approach life with a smile.”

 

You can connect with Neille at:

LinkedIn: Click Here

Twitter: Click Here

Facebook: Click Here

Instagram: Click Here

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