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Social Capital

Welcome to Social Capital, a weekly podcast where we dive into social relationships and how the investment you put into them establishes trust, reciprocity, and value within your network. Your host, Lori Highby, will connect with top business professionals to dive into their best techniques and stories to share with you!
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Now displaying: Page 7
Nov 25, 2019

About Raj Daniels

Since 2001, Raj has been assisting individuals to improve strategy and performance in business and personal lives.

Raj helps executives, entrepreneurs and business owners who are struggling to clarify and prioritize their focus so that they can be more intentional and accomplish their goals.

He’s been referred to as a guide, educator, and mentor by many in the Dallas business community and startup ecosystem.

As of May 2019, Raj has stepped into the role of Director of Strategic Partnerships.

 

Why do you believe networking is important?

“I grew up in Southeast London and I didn't have a strong support community. And when I look back in my life and see the trajectory and the route I've taken, I look back and think to myself, what would it look like if I had a network and intentional network if I had started out younger?”

 

What do I think about digital/social media networking?

“I think it's a weak substitute, at best. You know, I know there are a lot of platforms out there and…you know, you can connect with friends, connect with people, but connecting with an inanimate device is, you know, it doesn't connect to your soul.”

 

How can networking improve society?

“I've made it a practice to lead what I call three new people a week for many, many years now. And I'm agnostic. It doesn't matter what they do, where they're from, demographics, you know, socially. And what I found is that when you sit down with an individual, you realize that you have more in common with them than you don't.

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“I met one of the founders of Nexus PMG at a networking meeting that I have been attending for four years, and I met him, it was about two or three years ago. He was relatively new to the community and I essentially opened up my notebook and my Rolodex to him.

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“That's one area where technology has made life easier. It's so much easier today to pick up the phone, to get on a computer, you know, send a text message…”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“Approach it with a heart of abundance and looking to give. You know, I have a little phrase written on my whiteboard here. It says, "the day you plant the seed is not the day you eat the fruit." And what I mean by that is that sometimes you know, you can just tell where people come into a meeting and it's a very transactional meeting and I'm sure there's a time and place for that, but I think when you're truly networking, you're looking to give, you're looking because you care, you're looking because you want to see the other person succeed.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“Traditional, all day long. If it's digital, then LinkedIn only. But I do feel like that's also sorely lacking.”

 

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“Difficult question for me because I am, I'm extremely happy where I'm at. You know, I've got a great personal life. I have a great family life. I've got three beautiful daughters that I absolutely adore. So, I would just go back and if I were telling myself one thing, I'll just say it'll be okay. Everything's going to be fine.”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“Currently on Audible, I'm reading, I think it's called 21 Tips for the 21st Century by Yuval Hariri, the gentleman that wrote Sapiens. On my Kindle, I'm reading Creating Climate Wealth by Jigar Shah.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“Nike says it best. Just do it and repeat and rinse and repeat. There is no stopping doing it. And I think if you want to improve your life and the lives of people around you, I think networking is almost a social obligation.”

 

You can get in contact with Raj at:

Email: raj@rajdaniels.com(link sends e-mail)

LinkedIn: Click Here

Nov 20, 2019

About Joey Mure & Russ Morgan

The wall street mindset separates both families, entrepreneurs, and business owners from their money while others use it for their advantage. The secret to freedom is having your money work for you, not someone else when wealth building. Both Russ and Joey work tirelessly to be the hub for financial insight and education for individuals, business owners and investors nationwide. They believe that taking control over your finances will lead to greater prosperity and a more stress-free way of life.

 

What made you decide to start a podcast?

Joey: “Our podcast came initially out of the thought of we want to have a weekly conversation with our clients.”

Russ: “It was a way to scale that part of our business because we were growing and growing and growing and realized, okay, we can no longer do this belly to belly, one-on-one. We have to do this one to many. And so, we just use the technology of a podcast.”

 

How has podcasting grown your social network?

Joey: “It's put us in a totally different category that we didn't expect. So, I guess the long story of it is that because we started talking to our clients every single week, we didn't realize that other people were listening in on the conversation. So, we've had people from all across the country calling us up, emailing us messages on Facebook…”

Russ: “We hit a thousand followers on our Facebook page. And for us, because we're not super social in that way because we, you know, I have four kids, Joey has five. We live in an age where, you know, be more on social media, but we don't spend tons of time there. We've had no strategy to try to gain followers or likes. But all of that has been a direct result of our podcasting and it's amazing that people are following to see or hear the latest episodes.”

 

What are your best practices for building a community within your brand?

Russ: “I would say obviously the podcasting has allowed us to have more engaged conversations with our clients to ask them ‘what are those things that you're really interested in?’ And sometimes when you survey your client base about different things, you get crickets. You know, you don't get a whole lot of feedback. But from our standpoint, because now we do have, as you said, kind of a loyal listenership. You can kind of track it.”

Joey: “They want more kind of engagement that's more than just a step into listening to a podcast. They want to meet other people like themselves. They want to go deeper into the Q and A with our podcast guests.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

Russ: “A long time ago, Joey and I had had the pleasure of being a part of this group that actually brought this speaker into Birmingham. He wrote a book and it was, it was actually written for real estate agents of all things, which neither Joey nor I were…”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

Joey: “I think for us, that's really where the community comes in. So, once we actually interview somebody on the podcast, they come into the community as an expert who's going to be doing a Q and A with our audience. And then they stay in the community and they are accessible almost as easily as like texting them because our community is on its own app platform.”

Russ: “Nobody likes to be in an environment where they feel like they're all alone. And I think that sometimes when you go to a traditional networking environment, you feel like ‘I'm on an Island’.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

Joey: “I would say take the leap, and for us, what I will say is this, if we really allowed the fear of getting started to stand in the way, it would've been a big flop and we would have never gotten started. But I think nowadays there are so many services out there that all you have to do is go in record good content and hand it off to somebody.”

Russ: “Sometimes the thought of starting your own can be a little overwhelming at first. And one of the best pieces of advice that we were given is to be on other people's podcasts.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

Russ: “I think we use digital networking to create personal networking. And what I mean by that is what we have developed some pretty amazing relationships because of our podcasts, but nothing stops belly to belly. Like when you can sit in a room with somebody and over dinner break bread, like that's where relationships go deep.”

Joey: “It's hard to say this, but I think that digital is just a much more efficient means of accomplishing the same goal. And it's been hard. It's been hard to transition.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

Joey: “Take the plunge…don't be afraid that you don't have anything to talk about. You always have something that you can add as far as value to the world.”

Russ: “The more you start to learn about people, the more you can interact and conversate with them on their level.”

 

You can get in contact with Joey and Russ at:

Website: www.wealthwithoutwallstreet.com

Apple Podcast: Click Here

Facebook: Click Here

Joey’s LinkedIn: Click Here

Russ’ LinkedIn: Click Here

Nov 18, 2019

About Brian T. Shirley

Brian T Shirley has performed all across the USA, Canada, the Bahamas, and Japan for over 25 years. Brian has also hosted 2 radio shows (The Triangle Comedy Radio Show, The BTS Radio Show) and currently hosts the BTS Entertainment Corner radio segment. This is a call-in segment featured on the "What's the Story?" radio show which originates out of Reno, NV. Brian can be seen in several short films, web series and the upcoming feature film "Mark of the Butterfly" in March 2020.

 

In your opinion, how has social media helped or hurt Independent Entertainment?

“it's helped a great deal because now you have outlets where you didn't before. If you make a short film or music video or even the independent music artists out there that doing a LP or a song, you have a chance to get it out there for the public now. And that's the good news and the bad news because, and I've been a victim of myself on this too, sometimes with Independence, you know, you get excited and you do a project and you get it out there and maybe it wasn't completely edited and put together the best. So, it's a double-edged sword.”

 

As you've evolved and matured, has it been hard to keep up with the latest social media trends?

“When we were starting the interview today, I couldn't even figure out how to get the audio working. It took me a few minutes. Because I think Zoom, I've done twice now. But you know, you either keep learning or you start declining and that's with anything.”

 

How important is networking to you and how has social media affected this?

“It's important to everybody. If you're in any kind of industry that requires, you know, having relationships with people, social media has allowed that to be sped up to a certain point because now you can meet people that you normally wouldn't, you know, in other states or countries or whatever, and you can bond with them somehow or some way online.”

“It's all about building relationships and social media's kind of sped that up a little bit.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“I'll share my favorite one, which I've actually worked into the stage act, believe it or not. Years ago, through being a radio, internet radio, a BTS radio show I hosted in ACE and we were in the studio. But it's internet radio. And I started putting together, you know, guests for the show, and one of the gentlemen that I reached out to, I forgot how I found these people to be honest; it was Brian Hayden and he is a heart transplant recipient. So, and he'd written a couple of books…”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“It's a learning process that I'm still learning. I don't think anybody, unless they become just an absolute pro, can be 100% perfect. You have to learn what you're posting. You know, what kind of a response it’s getting, you know, you can target your audience.

“I think staying positive no matter what you're doing is a big factor because when you start going into those dark areas, you just draw out so many dark, dark people.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“I think just staying visible, staying positive and getting content that, you know, people, if they're in this situation, here's what they're going to need. Making sure that's out there, I think is a good way to grow your business.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“I think both are equally important and if you use both to, you know, play on each other, that's the perfect storm because just like what happened with Brian, you know, I met him online, we networked and then we met each other in person.”

 

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“I would say don't party as much. When I started doing comedy particularly, you know, yeah, I had a little fun, but treat the business side of show business a little more serious…”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“something I've learned through really pursuing this acting thing is you look at where you need to go and start focusing that way, and sometimes it will come about, without you even knowing it. And it takes a year or two sometimes like it did with this, so, immediate success doesn't always happen. But if you continue, I think these things will come back around as long as you stay, you know, you persevere.”

 

You can get in contact with Brian at:

Website: www.briantshirley.com

Email: briantshirley@aol.com(link sends e-mail)

LinkedIn: Click Here

Twitter: Click Here

Nov 13, 2019

About Molly Dill

Molly Dill is the director of gBETA Milwaukee at gener8tor. She joined gener8tor after a nine-year journalism career. Molly most recently served as managing editor of BizTimes Milwaukee, a bi-weekly regional business magazine where she also covered the Milwaukee startups, technology, and financial services beats. Molly previously was a reporter at the Marshfield News-Herald in Marshfield, Wisconsin. An Illinois native, she earned a bachelor's in journalism from Marquette University.

 

Why did you switch from journalism to startups?

“I had been covering startups for the last two years at BizTimes and I had been at BizTimes about eight years and rose to managing editor there. I felt that I kind of had plateaued and I needed a new challenge in my career and since I was covering startups and I had developed a lot of contacts in the startup world, it was kind of a natural evolution actually as a result of networking.”

 

What is gBETA Milwaukee?

“gBETA Milwaukee is a program of gener8tor. So, just to kind of give you an overview of gener8tor, it's a startup accelerator that was started in 2012. Joe Kirgues and Troy Vosseller are two of the co-founders who are still active today…we do take an ownership stake in return for a hundred-thousand-dollar investment and we only accept five startups per program.”

 

If a startup founder wants to apply to gBETA Milwaukee, what’s the best way to go about that?

“They can contact me. My email is molly@gener8tor.com(link sends e-mail) as generator with an eight. And we have a website gbetastartups.com. There's different city pages on there. Our fall program began October 24th and that goes through December 13th and then we'll take a little bit of a winter break and begin again in the spring.”

“We're looking for startups that are highly unique and highly scalable, and they must be based in greater Milwaukee for my program. So, it's not so much the main street businesses like a barbershop or a restaurant. It's more really original solutions to problems that others haven't come up with before or that are filling a need or a niche or are uniquely different.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“my first job was at the Marshfield News-Herald in Marshfield, which is in Marshfield, Wisconsin like you mentioned. And then I wanted to get back to Milwaukee. I went to Marquette and I really loved Milwaukee. I wanted to be here and so I had kept in touch with a mentor from that, from my internship during college. And this mentor, Julie, she kept me in mind…”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“several times per week, I try to meet various contacts for coffee, for drinks, whatever, just to make sure that we're keeping in touch and I know what's going on with them and they know what's going on with me and how we might be able to help each other or work together. So, I think a good networking interaction is a kind of give and take.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“go to a networking event in your industry that, you know, you'll want to meet people at and then just strike up conversations. It's really hard at first, but the more you go, the more everyone in the room isn't a stranger anymore. And these are some people you've met before and you can just pick up where you left off. So, I would say kind of forcing yourself to get out there and meet new people can help you so much.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“I like traditional networking. Digital networking, I think can be kind of a companion, but traditional in person, that's way more memorable than someone connecting with you on LinkedIn.”

 

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“I think I was a little hesitant at first to ask for help in building my network and advancing my career. And so, I would just kind of push myself to ask people to connect me to other people.”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“when it comes to founders, I would love to meet the founders of Airbnb because I remember my initial reaction to Airbnb being just completely appalled. Like, why would you go stay in someone's house, particularly if that person is still there, like just in their spare bedroom that you've never met before and how they overcame that challenge.”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“I'm currently reading The Lean Startup by Eric Ries. So, like we said, I'm relatively new to my role at gener8tor and I'm trying to learn as much as I can about the models that they find to be most effective. So, like they have an internal model, but a lot of it is based on The Lean Startup.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“I would say just be outgoing. Try not to be too shy and just ask for what you need from your network, and you like try to be helpful to your network as well so it's that mutually beneficial relationship.”

 

You can get in contact with Molly at:

Email: molly@gener8tor.com(link sends e-mail)

Website: www.gbetastartups.com

LinkedIn: Click Here

Twitter: Click Here

Nov 11, 2019

About Derrick Van Mell

Derrick is the CEO of The Center for Management Terms & Practices, the standards body for general management. Founded in 2018 after a successful pilot with the SBA, it is a for-profit association that trains managers at every level from every sector in size. The Center standardize the terminology of management so departments can communicate. It standardized a kit of one-page tools so people can collaborate efficiently. Information about training and events is at theindex.net. 

 

What's changed in your world since the last time we chatted/recorded?

“Well, my professional world, it's changed quite a bit really; giving up a consulting practice of 25 years, evolved it, evolved it a lot, I think it's fair to say into The Center. And one of the most common problems I saw when I was doing work with people, managers of all organizations at all levels was what I called a dodgeball meeting.”

 

Let's dive deeper into your business. Who do you primarily work with?

“We work with people who have general management responsibilities. So, those are people, and we have lots of terminology for this, who connect the dots to see the big picture, who have P and L responsibility, who are on the management track…”

 

What's the value-add they will get by working with you?

“The value add is really this fundamental point that if people don't really understand the common language of management, it's really not the words. It's really the concepts. That's what words are really.”

 

How can you be a resource to your network and mine?

“it's not just a way to optimize performance, it's a way to break down, you know, fundamental social barriers too. People love to work. It's important to them. And um, you know, you can't really treat people fairly unless you can understand them clearly.”

 

Paying it forward is an overarching theme that we hear and see often in the business world. Please share a recent pay-it-forward experience that you've had... Received or given.

“the center has been formally organized for a year and we're starting to develop, and we have developed our core installers and CEO soon, and senior managers from different departments and they've gotten to know each other which is great. So, I gathered them together yesterday to think about ‘how are we going to organize our first chapter’ because we have to build community, personal community, among our membership.”

 

Everyone loves a good tip or tool/resource that will help save them time or make their life easier. Do you have any tips or resources to share with our listeners?

“we're proud of The Index. If you want to take a little step further, you're going into a meeting and you know, it's about some management topic, you know, market research, workflow process, writing the employee manual, you know, financial accounting, whatever it is. You know, go to The Index and you'll see the General Managers Index.”

 

If we could remove all barriers and constraints what project would you do or take on? (this could be personal or professional)

“my vision of success is an international conference. People from different regions, different languages, literally different languages, people from across difficult, you know, political and cultural borders sharing ideas about management. It's not just a universal language, it's a universal activity.”

 

You can get in contact with Derrick at:

Phone: 608-260-9300

Website: www.theindex.net

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/derrickvanmell

Nov 6, 2019

About Brian Lee

Brian Lee, APR, is the president of Revelation PR, Advertising & Social Media, as well as a part-time lecturer on social media at Madison Area Technical College. Business Magazine named Brian to its "40 Under 40" list in 2012, and PRSA-Madison named him its 2013 Communicator of the Year. Outside of Revelation, Brian is the editor-in-chief of Madison Startups, an online publication that covers startup news in town, and he runs EatDrinkMadison.com, a Madison, Wisconsin, restaurant and bar guide that is searchable by amenities.

 

Let’s discuss reputation and crisis management.

“it has become more important lately, especially with social media speeding up the news cycle that something that you could let sort of hide or fester in the old days gets really exposed very quickly these days.

 

Tell us the difference between reputation and crisis management.

“reputation management is everything you do basically before an incident occurs, you are [inaudible] doing reputation management to help maintain and protect your brand, shape, perceptions, and provide crisis resiliency. Meanwhile, crisis management or crisis communications is everything that occurs after an incident happens. So, this is your doing crisis management to help restore your rebuild trust and reestablish a reputation.”

 

Why is having a good reputation important?

“when you have a good reputation, people are more likely to forgive you after an incident because it's out of character and the vice versa is true. Then there's the business case. A Deloitte study shows that when an organization's reputation is damaged, there's a decrease in revenue, customer's brand value and/or stock price. In fact, uh, some number, like 87% of CEOs worldwide said reputation risk is the most important strategic risk their organizations are facing.”

 

When talking about reputation management, what are some of the first things, first steps that a business or organization should look at?

“think about it like a campaign. And with any campaign, it's important to start with your goals. So, in this case, list your business goals first and then come up with corresponding reputation goals.”

 

Say something happens at your company that's really positioning you in a negative way. How is your organization going to recover from that?

“The first thing I tell people in companies is that you need to talk to all your internal audiences first. That might be staff, volunteers, board of directors, et cetera. They need to know what's going on, what the company's doing. It also helps improve morale. And it kills the rumor mill.”

 

Do you have a case study that you could share with us?

“it's a little old, but people know it, it's United Airlines, and this occurred back in 2017. And just to remind listeners out there is that United Airlines had a flight that was oversold. They needed to put on their own crew members. So, they asked for volunteers. Finally, they had to actually forcibly remove a passenger…”

 

What's changed in your world since the last time we chatted/recorded?

“I launched the corporate event planning business called the revelation events and I was also just named an entrepreneur in residence at Madison area technical college.”

 

Let's dive deeper into your business. Who do you primarily work with?

“Revelation: We primarily work with hospitality clients, realtors, developers, associations, tech, and B2B companies. And although our clients do span the state and the country, our main specialty is helping clients win Madison.”

 

How can you be a resource to your network and mine?

“one of the things you mentioned in the introductions, I am also the editor in chief of a newspaper here in Madison. We cover all the startups and tech and biotech and so forth going on. It's been interesting because there's been a lot of communities in the Midwest that sort of want to replicate what Madison has in terms of an entrepreneurial ecosystem. So, for example…”

 

In our initial interview - you had said you'd like to connect with decision-makers in companies. Have you made progress on connecting with any particular person?

“at some point, I did reach out to that person and I just think of a parallel example that earlier this year I was pursuing another business opportunity for Revelation. I have several mutual connections to help reach out on my behalf, but they didn't have any luck. So finally, I'm like, okay, I just gotta take matters into my own hands. I reached out myself and I did get a meeting of it.”

 

Paying it forward is an overarching theme that we hear and see often in the business world. Please share a recent pay-it-forward experience that you've had... Received or given.

“in that previous interview, I mentioned I often refer business to someone. I don't expect that quid pro quo. So, one time I was at this networking event and I met one person who was looking to buy a particular service and another person I met at that same networking event who actually provided that service. So, it was getting toward the end of the night and I realized, I bet they're not going to even meet because they're about to leave. So, I made sure to grab both of them and introduced them, and they actually ended up doing business together.”

 

Everyone loves a good tip or tool/resource that will help save them time or make their life easier. Do you have any tips or resources to share with our listeners?

“I really like using OneNote. I use it to keep notes for all my different businesses and I also keep a set of personal notes. So, I do everything from vacation planning to save recipes, to writing outlines of blog posts on it. And I like being able to access the same notes from any device wherever I am.”

 

If we could remove all barriers and constraints what project would you do or take on? (this could be personal or professional)

“I would love to write a movie script or at least finish the one I started so many years ago and then shop it around Hollywood. I also wrote a TV pilot script years ago. It didn't get picked up obviously, but I would retool and shop that around too.”

 

You can get in contact with Brian at:

Email: brian@revalation.agency(link sends e-mail)

Website: https://revelation.agency/

LinkedIn: Click Here

Nov 4, 2019

About Deanna Singh

Deanna Singh, the author of Purposeful Hustle, wants to live in a world where marginalized communities have power. As an expert social entrepreneur, she is obsessed with making the world a better place and she will build or break systems to create positive change. Deanna is described as a trailblazer and dynamic speaker who is at the forefront of social change. She is an accomplished author, educator, business leader, and social justice champion!

 

Please share more about your book, Purposeful Hustle and why networking is important to Purposeful Hustlers.

“the first half of the book, we really talk about purpose. And the idea there, you know, people throw around these words, but when I talk about purpose, I mean what are you uniquely positioned to do in the world? So, what is it that you can accomplish that really nobody else can?”

 

How does a Purposeful Hustler prepare for a meeting?

“a lot of times, we have these amazing people in our network and we get a meeting with them and we're so excited and then we get to the meeting and it flops, because we haven't taken the time to prepare in advance and really think through what would be the most effective use of their time…”

 

What are some of the best questions you have been asked when people are trying to network with you?

“my all-time favorite question is what should I have asked that I didn't ask? You know, is there anything that you think I should know that might not be on my radar?”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“one of the things I decided to do was have two o'clock tea on Tuesdays. Now I don't think I ever ended up having any of the meetings happen that way where it was actually Tuesday. Sometimes it was Thursday or Wednesday morning or whether, you know, I think probably less than 5% of them ended up to being Tuesday at two o'clock but the idea was I was going to try and reach out to 52 people, so one a week at least minimally that were not part of my network that I thought would be really good and my network.”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“one of the things that I've been working on is trying to use the tools that already exist out there to really continue to nurture the relationship. And obviously one of the biggest kinds of tools that we have at our disposal now is social media. So, just making sure that I'm posting content that I think is relevant to my network…”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“It really comes down to being strategic. You know, a lot of times I'll have people in, they'll say I'm going to a networking event and I'll say, that's great. Like, who are you hoping to meet? They’re like, I don't know.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“I will say what I have found to be incredible, and this has really been over the last year and I think I started as sort of a naysayer with this and now have completely changed my tune, is the ability to be able to use, kind of blend the two, right, through video conferencing.”

 

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“One of the things that I would definitely really stress is the ability to collect and keep clean my CRM (customer relationship management system).”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with, and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“the one that would be for me super exciting would be Michelle Obama. And I do think that I could probably connect in less than six degrees of separation. But it's one of those things where like where we started this conversation about, well, what would you ask? And you know, what would that mean and what would I be able to bring to the table?”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“When I was in college, I sort of made it like a game, right? Where I would try and find the most intimidating person in the room for whatever reason, whatever room I was in. And then I made it a point to try and go up to that person and just speak to them. And I think that like one of the things that I always tell people is I get it. I understand that you're nervous, but the thing that will help you get over your nerves is practicing, right? And pushing yourself out of your comfort zone.”

 

You can get in contact with Deanna at:

Website: www.deannasingh.com

LinkedIn: Click Here

Oct 30, 2019

About Christie Ruffino

Christie Ruffino is a serial entrepreneur who has had a very purposeful journey since she started building her business tribe over 10 years ago. It has all come together in a way that now serves her clients at the highest level. From her first entrepreneurial effort as the Top Girl Scout Cookie Seller to her current business as the President of the Dynamic Professional Women’s Network, Inc., Christie has learned how to guide other entrepreneurs to get groundbreaking results as a business strategy coach.

 

What's changed in your world since the last time we chatted/recorded?

“I guess the piece that's changed is because technology is changing so much. We've adapted to create opportunities for people to connect and for our community to build virtually. I remember at first in the beginning years doing a webinar or doing some kind of a conference call. It was difficult, and now it's so easy…”

 

Let's dive deeper into your business. Who do you primarily work with?

“We are an industry exclusive leads group. That's kind of what we've been for the last 15 years. It's typically business to consumer type of opportunities, a little bit of business to business…A couple things that make us different is, of course, we're all women. And then a few things about how we work make it a little bit more conducive to working women.”

 

How can you be a resource to your network and mine?

“We have the different chapters that meet. So, that's really about supporting them on the ground level. We do events occasionally. It's been hard to do local events, you know, in specific locations. We do a lot of them, but it's not necessarily attractive to everybody based on where they're located. And so, we've been kind of transitioning to do virtual events.”

“We have a training library that we've developed and we're continuing to add more teaching into that.”

 

Who is it that you’re looking to network with?

“specifically, women who are looking to kind of realize that their business is more than the company that they're with and the products that they sell. It's more about who they are as an individual and the experience that they bring to the table, as well as their story. And so, for the last eight years, I've been helping women position their stories to build a stronger personal brand.”

 

Paying it forward is an overarching theme that we hear and see often in the business world. Please share a recent pay-it-forward experience that you've had... Received or given.

“I honestly think when in the networking world, like I'm constantly making connections for people. People are constantly making connections for me. I know a lot of the people I hire are former clients…I mean there's a lot of pay it forward I do in my life...”

 

Everyone loves a good tip or tool/resource that will help save them time or make their life easier. Do you have any tips or resources to share with our listeners?

“Grammarly. Oh my gosh. So, if you've not used Grammarly, I never thought I needed Grammarly because, I don’t know, I sent my stuff to an editor. I didn't think I needed it. But you can download Grammarly to your computer and it fixes everything. With a Facebook post, with an email you're sending, with your website updates, like it basically connects to your PC and will suggest whatever you need to do to fix your stuff.”

 

If we could remove all barriers and constraints what project would you do or take on? (this could be personal or professional)

“Right now, it's doing my own podcast…people want to consume information. They want to continually, not everybody, but people in the personal development space, we want to keep filling our brains with good information and good direction and good resources from people that remember the resources like they're supposed to.”

 

You can get in contact with Christie at:

Website: www.christieruffino.com

Website: www.ourdpwn.com

LinkedIn: Click Here

Oct 28, 2019

About Martha

Martha Carrigan is the President & CEO of Big Shoes Network (BSN): a family of niche job boards and resources serving the Midwest and Southeast. Big Shoes Network specializes in advertising, digital and traditional communication, graphic and web design, marketing, public relations, and social media industries. Martha is responsible for business development, strategic marketing, and financial management.

 

What's changed in your world since the last time we chatted/recorded?

“Well, my world consists of my work personally and then the industry. And so as far as Big Shoes Network goes, what's changed with that is we've added, sort of under the current consulting arm, called Next Steps because we had been doing so much personal branding and some professional branding…”

 

Let's dive deeper into your business. Who do you primarily work with?

“one Avenue for our target customer, our folks that are seekers or not seekers, but potentially great employees or talent. Where we generate our money from is from clients posting jobs and adding ads on our site. So that client, we have about 40% of our business is agency, 50% is corporate and 10% is nonprofit and government. And I define that a little differently because although for example, the University of Wisconsin is one of our largest clients and they are nonprofit, but they have more of a corporate sort of feel and size and all of that. So, we lump them in with the corporate. Um, yeah. So, we have about 4,000 clients and we've posted well over 10,000 jobs in our history.”

 

What's the value-add they will get by working with you?

“We are very customer service and high touch. That's our culture. We love helping. We will bend over backwards for you.”

 

How can you be a resource to your network and mine?

“We really love, like I said, helping people. We get a fair number of clients that will post, and we'll circle back to them and say, perhaps you can modify this a bit in order to get a better response. Additionally, when you are utilizing a larger organization, if you want to do some adjusting, tweaking, extending, that's really not an option. But with us, it really is…”

 

In our initial interview - you had said you'd like to connect with Denzel Washington or Bill Gates. Have you made progress on connecting with them?

“I've connected with Denzel in my dreams, and I have not yet connected with Bill Gates. I'm working my way up the ladder. I just had a conversation with Michael Moni, UWM’s Chancellor. And the CEO of Microsoft now is a UWM grad.”

 

Paying it forward is an overarching theme that we hear and see often in the business world. Please share a recent pay-it-forward experience that you've had... Received or given.

(Discussing a recent experience at a grocery store) “You can only pay with credit card. And I've seen that more and more and I get it. It's fast, it's reliable. But this woman didn't have a credit card and a lot of people don't, or they opt not to use it for various reasons. So, she got back in line into the line next to mine, got to the front of the line and the woman said it was for credit card only. We're talking an hour later. So, she got in line behind me and I just, I could hardly talk. I was so upset. She was fine with it. I'm like, this is not fair. So, she and I struck up a conversation and then as I was leaving, I'm like, no. So, I went back, and I swiped my card and I was like, this is for her and whatever she's buying.”

 

Everyone loves a good tip or tool/resource that will help save them time or make their life easier. Do you have any tips or resources to share with our listeners?

“one of those is we have a business directory. So, if a client comes to us and says, Hey, I need a website built. I don't want to hire an employee necessarily to do that. It's just a project or it's a, you know, a one-year thing. I'll send them to our business directory and say, go look on the web developer site, and Keystone click is in there…”

 

If we could remove all barriers and constraints what project would you do or take on? (this could be personal or professional)

“I'd really like to learn Spanish. I would love to just for the fun of it. I love the language, but secondly, I'd like to be useful in underserved markets. I've always wanted to volunteer for, for example, Red Cross Disaster Relief because I'm super good at organizing, but I just don't think it would have much value unless I spoke a different language.”

 

You can get in contact with Martha at:

Phone: 414-962-4222

Email: martha@bigshoesnetwork.com(link sends e-mail)

Website: www.bigshoesnetwork.com

LinkedIn: Click Here

Oct 23, 2019

About Paul M. Neuberger

Paul M. Neuberger believes in making the impossible possible.  A masterful speaker and trainer, he challenges people to dig deep and discover talents they never knew they had. Whether it’s working hands-on with small teams or presenting in front of hundreds of people, Paul is adept at truly connecting with his audience and getting to the heart of important issues. He has worked with leading organizations around the world to help improve effectiveness, performance and cultivate a stronger sense of passion in the workplace.

A sales expert, Paul is known to many organizations as The Cold Call Coach. He has taught thousands of students in more than a hundred countries through his Cold Call University program, helping sales professionals in a range of industries close more business in less time than ever before.

Paul serves as President of The Starr Group, a trusted leader in the insurance field and is one of the largest family-owned, independent insurance agencies in Wisconsin. He is also the Chairman of the 2019 American Heart Association Milwaukee Heart Walk. Lastly, Paul is the Founder of C-Suite for Christ; a group of business executives who share stories of how including Christ in our daily lives has positively affected our work environment.

 

What drives you? Where do you find the motivation to do what you do?

“I'm just drawn to the slogan ‘making the impossible possible’ because it's only impossible until somebody does it for the very first time. If you want to get the most out of me, if you want to get me to dig deep and accomplish something that never has been done before by anybody, just tell me it can't be done and then watch me.”

 

What is your #1 secret to cold call success?

“I would say the number one tip that I can give for cold calling success is it's all about value. And how I define value is something that you can offer.”

 

You've accomplished so much as an entrepreneur in your young career. What's next for you?

“I look at life as a bicycle. I am peddling as fast as I can. I am providing the horsepower to make sure that that bike can go from point A to point B, but God's got the handlebars. So, I don't know what direction I'm heading unnecessarily.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“I would say probably when I was a financial advisor with Thrivent Financial, one of the things that I teach, this in my keynotes, I teach this in my cold call training, you have to be incredibly strategic when you sell. Cold calling is not a numbers game. It is quality over quantity…”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“It's really about two things, calendar and delegation. If I'm not on top of my calendar and delegation, I'm in big trouble.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“Value. I’ve got to keep coming back to it. I believe in life, you reap what you sow, and I believe in life, before you can get, you have to give.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“That's like asking me to pick peanut butter or jelly. What a tough question. Well, I know where you're going, but I would have to say both.”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with, and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“I would say the first person that comes to my mind is Simon Sinek. And the reason I talk about Simon Sinek is I owe Simon Sinek a tremendous debt of gratitude. When I was a financial advisor, just getting started in that career…”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“You only live once. Make it happen, and if you fall short of the mark, get back up and try it again. But don't live with regrets…”

 

You can get in contact with Paul at:

Website: www.paulmneuberger.com

Email: paul@paulmneuberger.com(link sends e-mail)

LinkedIn: Click Here

Twitter: Click Here

Oct 21, 2019

About Veronica Hinke

Veronica Hinke has been researching the Titanic for as long as she can remember. She has interviewed hundreds of experts on lifestyles, foods, and drinks for Tribune Media and maintains close working relationships with leading chefs and mixologists around the world. Her report, “Titanic Cocktails,” appeared in Wine Enthusiast magazine, honoring the hundredth anniversary of the Titanic, and was blogged by the Village Voice. Ms. Hinke currently resides just outside of Chicago, Illinois.

 

Why did you write your book "The Last Night on the Titanic: Unsinkable Drinking, Dining & Style"?

“I really wanted to honor the 100th anniversary year of the sinking of the Titanic, which was in 2012. The anniversary year was in 2012 and so I spent pretty much the whole year prior, 2011, really researching to find a hook.”

 

What do you hope readers will take away from reading your book?

“I want people to be inspired by these people. Every story that I told had a purpose, kept me going, and it really kept me going through some of the darkest days in my life.”

 

Is it a cookbook? What is a culinary narrative?

“pretty much it's a narrative with some recipes sprinkled throughout. And I really curated those recipes to be purposeful where they were located. I strategically put them in spots.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“I organized a party for the book, and I didn't want to just have a book party. I want to do something really special. And this was specifically for the press.”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“Social media really has helped. And as even though I mentioned earlier that it's so much nicer to get together in person, I think that's still important, but I'm a huge fan of Facebook and Instagram.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“Why not share your network? You know, I mean, some people might be concerned about duplication. Hey, if it's duplicated, they'll get the message twice or maybe three times. I think that's a lot less of a problem than someone being isolated from, you know, being able to work towards their goals.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“I love in person. It's my own personal preference. I would rather be sitting with you right now talking face to face obviously. But then, I love that this opportunity is there because of the technology.”

 

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“Well, I would say I wouldn't change a thing. I'm so happy about what I did because that's the secret I think is you have to believe that. And I think the one thing I would say is make the most of every minute and still have that balance that you need to have to live a decent life. But I think the older you get, the more people you lose, and you start to realize the fragility of life and you think you have forever and you don't, you really don't.

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“Well, and I'm glad you mentioned someone that's no longer here because the person that I would love to sit down and have lunch with or have a cup of coffee with or tea is Julia Child.”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“right now, I'm reading a lovely little book and it's by John Steinbeck and it's Of Mice and Men.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“one piece of advice I try to remember is that it takes 30 days to make a habit. And that's not that long, Lori. You know, it's like if you really stick your nose to the grindstone, you can come up with a new habit in 30 days and so think of a new habit that you would like to instill in your life and make it happen.”

 

You can get in contact with Veronica at:

LinkedIn: Click Here

Instagram: Click Here

Twitter: Click Here

Oct 16, 2019

About Kay Edwards

Kay Edwards is the founder of Outsight Network an association of senior-level consultants that serve mission-driven organizations. The mission of Outsight is to build lasting relationships and be relentlessly helpful. Kay helps her clients ask better questions so they can understand their organizations, their customers, and their marketplace, and turn that understanding into strategies that create life-long customers.

 

How do you define great business relationships?

“I think a business relationship really puts the other person at the center without losing sight of what you want and need from the relationship.”

 

What is the greatest barrier to building great business relationships?

“I think there are two kinds of people in the world. There are people who really instinctively know how to build relationships and they do it really well but don't often understand the process. And then there are people like me who don't do it instinctively and there's a little bit of fear.”

 

What can leaders do to overcome barriers in building relationships?

“one of the things is to be really intentional about it and even if it comes naturally to you to understand who are you building relationships with? Why? What do you want from the relationships? How do you make that work?”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“actually, a client located in Europe. We were helping them build relationships in the U.S. It was a nonprofit organization, so they had as their cause helping emerging democracies around the world. And through some networking connections, I found myself having breakfast with the owner of the San Francisco Giants.”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“always make sure we schedule the next connection. Always make sure I know what I'm going to talk with next about someone, and always understand how am I adding value to this relationship.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“Well again, be intentional. But the other thing that I've learned that works really well when I first started my firm about 20 years ago, there was a rule that I created that said, ‘I never walk out of a meeting without asking for someone else I should meet’.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“I really like face to face, but I understand that digital has its role as well. I look at them as tools and in some situations digital is more appropriate and in some situations, face-to-face is more appropriate.”

 

If you could go back 20 years, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“I had to write down every single word I was going to say on the phone because I was so introverted and so scared of picking up the phone and so afraid of what the person on the other end would say…”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with, and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“So, when I was doing my MBA, this actually was a project of ours, we were assigned the task of identifying a leader that we admired and reaching out to them and interviewing them and writing a paper on it. Well, this was the time when right after Mel Gibson had produced…”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“I am rereading the book, The Dip by Seth Godin. who's one of my favorite authors.

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“Just do it. Just make time on your calendar.”

 

You can get in contact with Kay at:

Website: www.outsightnetwork.com

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kay-edwards-77a501

Oct 14, 2019

About John Waid

John is the founder and CEO of C3 corporate culture consulting, a firm specializing in aligning an organization's culture with its strategic goals. John has worked in sales and marketing at Pfizer, Pepsi Company, Nestle and Chateau St. Michelle winery. During these experiences, he developed a heightened awareness of the indispensable role people's attitudes play in implementing effective processes and procedures. John is an author, speaker, facilitator, and thought leader in the area of corporate culture and its positive impact on people and companies. He was born in Mexico City, has lived in five countries and speaks fluent Spanish, Portuguese and English. He is an author, keynote speaker, blogger, soccer fan, wine enthusiast, and proud dad. He currently makes his home in Atlanta.

 

Why does culture matter and what is the definition of corporate culture?

“Culture is basically some values and some behaviors that you stand for. Most companies have made an effort to define their culture through selecting some values and then also some behaviors to go with those values…”

 

How easy or hard is it to implement great company culture?

“The biggest barrier to implementing culture is self-awareness. And self-awareness is a topic that’s uh…90% of people think they're self-aware, only about 10% of people are.”

 

How much does company culture contribute to results, profits, and all other variables?

“How much more do you think that Chick-fil-A sells versus a Kentucky Fried Chicken?... 500% more. Yes. Because of the experience, because of the people.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“I met a person who wrote a book called The Platinum Rule and he was from New York, he lives in San Diego, and what he found out is that the golden rule ‘do unto others as you would have them do unto you’, wasn't working for him…”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“Don't be shy. Get out there. Say hello and start with hello. Care about the other person. Use the platinum rule. And you know, build a relationship to the point where they want to buy from you. Because at the end of the day, we don't sell anything, people buy.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“Digital's a good way to get to see how people remember you that you've met before. I often find when I send out things digitally that people that I haven't talked to in a while, will reach back around and say, ‘Hey John, haven't heard from you. I got this email from you; I got this material from you…”

 

If you could go back 20 years, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“I would've gone to Wharton and studied international business because I've could've gotten in there as an MBA. I would have found my calling, you know, which is training and development and the area of culture earlier in life so that I could have devoted more time to it.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“Be good to people. Figure out what your calling is.”

 

You can get in contact with John at:

Phone: 404-915-3051

Email: jwaid@corporatecultureconsulting.com(link sends e-mail)

Website: www.c3culture.com

LinkedIn: Click Here

Oct 9, 2019

About Anna Koeck

Born in communist Russia, Dr. Anna Koeck emigrated to the US at the age of 10 with her single mom Rimma. With hard work and perseverance, Dr. Koeck received a triple business degree from UW Madison, managed multi-million-dollar software projects at Epic Systems and graduated Magna Cum Laude from ICO with her Doctor of Optometry Degree. To help the entire world see clearly at a transparent price, she opened Theia Vision Care and within the first year was voted the top doctor in Lake Country, WI.

 

Why do you do what you do?

“I come from a very different country. I'm an immigrant and I watched my mom work really hard to bring me to this country and to get me where I'm at. And my mom is definitely an inspiration. She's a role model.”

 

When should your child get a first eye exam?

“6 to 18 months should be their first eye exam. And that tends to surprise people.”

 

What is Direct Medical Care and Theia Concierge Care, and why is it right for me?

“In a nutshell, the direct care is the idea of I'm directly seeing you and there's not an intermediary third party involved, be it insurance, vision plan, or other pieces. By eliminating steps, I'm eliminating time and money spent on that so I can now spend the time in my chair with you and ask you extra questions and get your kids in. And because I save money, I pass that on to you as well in the product and services.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“Just a random event running off a couple of years ago to a vision expo in New York. And I was flying out of Milwaukee right here. And typically there's not a long line to get into the airport, but that particular morning, for whatever reason, I don't know if it was spring break or what was going on, this long, long line…”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“Continuing to put yourself out there and making the time. So, there's always a conversation about time management, and how do you do everything? You don't. You put things on your schedule and you make something a priority. And if you do that, it’ll happen.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“Put yourself out there. So, it's always, you know, some of these cliches, but they're kind of cliche for a reason, right? You get growth out of being uncomfortable.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“I'm still thinking about that question as well. I mean, a little bit of a balance.”

 

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“That's really interesting to kind of go back in time. What if I could change anything? And the more I thought about it, the more I kind of embraced the overall, ‘you're exactly where you're supposed to be’. And I firmly believe that.”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“The professional answer would probably be Oprah and there are ways to, you know, reach out on her. There's an email account. You know, I went to graduate school in Chicago, her studios were down there. So, I think it's possible.”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“I just finished I am Malala. And she is a huge activist for education, children's education and particularly girl’s education, grew up in Pakistan and through a variety of things that have happened, I think she now lives in England.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“There's a code that says, ‘there is no way to happiness, happiness is the way’ and replace happiness with anything else. So, you just do it, you find an event and you go to it or…you just kind of continue to do the things that you're looking to achieve and hopefully eventually you get there.”

 

 

You can get in contact with Dr. Anna Koeck at:

Office Phone: 262-361-0022

Website: www.theiavisioncare.com

LinkedIn: Click Here

Oct 7, 2019

About Lisa Danforth

Lisa Danforth is a business strategist and firm believer that business doesn’t have to be so hard. She helps women navigate obstacles & struggles that are specific to women in business so they can create the impact & income they desire with less overwhelm & more joy.

 

How important are boundaries in business?

“I think of boundaries as the bridge to whatever success that it is that you're looking for. And if we don't have boundaries in place…”

 

What is the double-bind for women and how does it get in the way of their success, personally and professionally?

“The double-bind for women is a well-known phenomenon that women are either perceived as warm or competent but rarely both.”

 

What’s the best way to achieve work-life balance?

“I actually don't believe in work-life balance. I'm going to be totally honest with you. I don't think that we want everything in our lives to be weighed out evenly.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“I would have to say it is with a woman that I met online, sort of peripheral. There was a group of people that I spent time with, but there was a woman on the periphery, two layers out, right, and we kept sort of bumping into each other and talking, talking, talking, you know, just sort of bumping into the groups. And she finally reached, she reached out because she is in social media. We set up a conversation to chat and we have over the years become best friends…”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“There's a couple of things that really come to mind and the first one is being intentional. I think we need to be more intentional in anything that we do and who we are in order to be more effective…”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“Be very intentional about what you're looking for. What will support you? How can you support other people?”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“For me, it's hand down traditional. I don't know if it's just because of my age. I'm 54. I can jump into a conversation and not rudely like ‘Hey, what are you doing?’ Really just sort of ease into a conversation.”

 

If you could go back 20 years, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“I would say two things. One, relax. Rubbing a square peg in a round hole is not going to work, right? I mean, I refer to it as the white-knuckled grip. It's just ‘push, push, push, push’. Which, may I say, was how I was trained in business. It's a very masculine, dominant push energy, ‘go, go, go’. The more I have relaxed and leaned into my feminine energy and how I do business, my businesses have flourished.”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“One of the women that I've been following, and I adore her because she is strong, confident, brilliant, puts herself out there and takes no bull from anyone. But is all of service in the work that she does. The name is Nilofer Merchant. She wrote a book called, um, what is it...The Power of Onlyness.”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“It’s called Psycho-Cybernetics. It is all about the mind and focusing on what is working for us and not re-living our past, moving into the future through our thoughts and behaviors of the past. Not allowing them to control what we do in the future.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“Just be very intentional on the business that you want, the life that you want, the relationships that you're looking to build.”

 

You can get in contact with Lisa at:

Email: lisa@lisadanforth.com(link sends e-mail)

Website: Click Here

LinkedIn: Click Here

Oct 2, 2019

About Neille Hoffman:

Neille Hoffman is a creative innovator and entrepreneur dedicated to the craft of design. With over 20 years of branding expertise, she has created integrated communication solutions for long term clients across a spectrum of industries including; healthcare, education, entertainment, luxury goods, and real estate. As a coach, consultant, speaker, and recovering perfectionist, she has the unique ability to recognize the gifts others don’t see in themselves and empower them to follow their dreams.

 

Why is branding more important than ever?

“I believe branding is more important than ever because our world is so connected with our whole digital age. We can know people down the block, but we can also know people across the world. And we really need to have some differentiation.”

 

What is the difference between branding and personal branding?

“There's a fine line, I think. I think that personal branding is really who your genuine self is. So I don't really think you can manufacture a personal brand. Some people think that they can change the way they dress or they can talk different or you know, they can kind of create who they want people to see them as…”

 

Where do you begin when you are creating a brand?

“I always like to dive deep with questions and research. I think a lot of, at least for personal branding and for business branding as well, we have to take a look at our mindset and our limited beliefs…”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had? How was the connection made? What was the outcome of the connection?

“My favorite networking experience that I have had here in Milwaukee was meeting Sara Meaney, Sara Meaney and I both had our own businesses at the time. Hers was Comet Branding and mine was Aurum Design and we were both moving into a new building actually across the street from here in the Third Ward. And we just happened to be throwing our open house parties on the same night.”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“I make a very pointed effort to reach out to friends and check in on them, see what is going on with their lives, get updates from people, schedule coffees, and really have a genuine interest in the people that I have met.”

 

What advice would you offer to the business professional who is looking to grow their network?

“The number one thing I would say is take action. I think for far too long I stayed on the sidelines.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking- which do you find more value in? Please explain.

“Right now, I don't want to say I want to find more value in it, but I want to say I'm stepping into it. So again, outside of my comfort zone is the digital networking. So I have recently become part of an entrepreneurial networking group online and it's people from all over the world. And what I like about that is you're actually connecting with people who think like you do and are so supportive. It's crazy.”

 

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more of/less of/differently with regards to your professional career?

“I would tell myself to trust my instincts more. I think I in the past have deferred to other people's opinions.”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree? How would you start that journey?

“So, I think I have a little bit of a different answer for this one. I could think of, you know, a handful of people that I would like to say, but this is going to be a little out there. I would like to connect with my future self. And I would hope that there are at least six people I have yet to meet who are going to help me grow into that future self.

 

What book are you reading right now?

“So, every year, and I think you've probably got this answer before, I read the Alchemist. So, I'd finished that actually not too long ago…”

 

Any final word of advice to offer our listeners with regards to growing and supporting your network?

“I would just say to make genuine connections and always approach life with a smile.”

 

You can connect with Neille at:

LinkedIn: Click Here

Twitter: Click Here

Facebook: Click Here

Instagram: Click Here

Sep 30, 2019

About Jen Garrett

Jennifer Garrett is a dynamic internationally recognized speaker, author of the book Move the Ball and high-performance expert who is widely known for pushing boundaries, inspiring others, and driving individuals, businesses, and organizations out of their comfort zones to play at higher levels. Today, Jennifer, together with her organization, Feel the Push provides lessons on how to play for success and how to step up the game in order to drive results and cross the goal line. Her organization also works with collegiate and professional athletes as they transition off the field to be all-star players in life beyond the game. Jennifer draws upon her experience from her 20-year career in fortune 50 companies where she had a proven track record of delivering results, boosting organizational efficiency, driving cultural transformation, closing large-scale negotiations and exceeding targets.

Her seven college degrees coupled with her extensive corporate executive leadership and military experience as an Army judge advocate officer gives Jennifer a diverse skill set that is well suited to connect with audiences around the world and help individuals and organizations to move the ball and achieve long term excellence.

 

You have a book about football and how it relates to business and life. Why football and how can it help us and our listeners?

“There's a lot that sports can teach us, such as the teamwork, the resiliency, but I found that there was a lot more that football had taught as well as those other concepts that I really just resonated with.”

 

You have seven degrees and that's fascinating. Why so many and how has it helped your career?

“How it's helped me is I really think it's important to find out what unique differentiated value you can bring to any conversation or…”

 

Any specific projects that you're working on that you would like to share with our listeners?

“One of the things that I've been working on is I'm launching a program in September called inside the huddle. And what it is designed to be is a community where people will support you, champion you, hold you accountable…”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“I have been able to connect through these social channels with a number of professional athletes for example. And one of them, who I've become really great friends with, he played on the 1985 Chicago bears Superbowl championship team.”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“First and foremost, I think it's important to A. remain your authentic self and so own who you are and be true to that.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“You have to be the quarterback. As I mentioned in my book, you are the quarterback and it's really up to you to take action to move that ball forward.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“What I will say, it's being strategic with both of them. So there is something to be said about having in-person connections and oftentimes I will connect with people digitally and if there's an opportunity to follow up in person, either because we're in the same geographical area or because we are traveling to a geography that we're going to be.”

 

If you could go back 20 years, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“What I would say to my 20-year-old self is don't ever think that you can't do something.”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“I would really like to connect with Elon Musk because…I'm a Tesla owner, so I love the product…I just like his way of thinking, his visionary mentality…”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“The book is called extreme teams…and basically it looks at why these seven companies, Pixar, Netflix, Airbnb, and some other cutting-edge companies tend to succeed where other companies fail.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“I think you should view every day as an opportunity to interact and meet new people and take advantage of those, but also a bigger reason why you network aside from the looking at how you can mutually support one another and building the relationships like we talked about, there's just the growing and the learning that you get from interacting with different people.”

 

You can get in contact with Jen at:

LinkedIn: Click Here

Website: Click Here

Sep 25, 2019

About Haris Reis

 

Haris is a 2-time national award-winning entrepreneur, 2-time national best-selling author, keynote speaker, and a digital marketer. He previously co-founded a media company that helped authors, speakers, and coaches build their brands online. He took the company to a 6-figure business in 10 months. Haris was also previously a growth hacker at Vaynermedia, building Gary Vaynerchuk’s personal brand. He’s built SYNCSUMO, a SAAS Solution with customers in 30+ countries and now runs a consultancy that has generated millions of dollars for clients.

 

Why does health matter in business?

“You think clear, you have more energy. The people with the most energy throughout the day win.”

                                              

What was the biggest change in the food side of things that that you made in your life?

“Everybody's different, but you just have to test different things.”

 

How has travel helped with business in general?

“Travel is huge because it lets you unplug because if you're always working, working, working and you're always doing the same thing…”

 

How do you eliminate scarcity mindset?

“A lot of business owners, including myself, before I used to think, let's say you make 10 bucks…and then most business owners want to keep 10 bucks in their own pockets, want to use it for their own experiences or whatever, because they're scared because they don't know where the next $10 is going to come from…”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“To your point of networking in today's world, a lot and networking parties or after parties or whatever you want to call them, come with an open bar, which a little bit of liquid courage helps…”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“Typically, I just give a lot. Gary’s (Vaynerchuk) book, Jab, Jab, Right Hook should be retitled to Jab, Jab, Jab, Jab, Jab, Jab, Jab, Jab, Right Hook. Because typically, I just give as much as I can and then when I give something to someone, they typically stay in front of me asking, how can I help you?”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“You’ve got to get out there. There's no easy way about it. You’ve got to go to networking events. You’ve got to go to speaking seminars. You’ve got to get out there somehow, someway.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“You're complete stranger online. In-person, people feel you. I don't know how to describe it. They feel your vibrations and they feel how good of a person you are and your energy levels. I mean, there's definitely a different sting to that because you can't get that online.”

 

If you could go back 20 years, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“Definitely be more patient. Before I had always used to, you know, if something didn’t go my way, I would get sad or depressed or ‘oh my goodness, the world is against me.’ Uh, now I just rely on myself. Whatever happens, it's my fault.”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“I mean, I'm connected to everyone I really want to be. There's no one I really can't get to or haven't gotten to that I want to talk to.”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“The Fourth Agreement is one of my favorite books ever. It's changed the way I think, the way I approach life.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“Never settle. And especially, momentum is huge in business. That's probably the biggest thing. Once you have momentum, you don't want to stop.”

 

You can get in contact with Haris at:

Instagram: Click Here

LinkedIn: Click Here

Sep 18, 2019

About Adam Connors

Adam Connors is a sought-after speaker, social architect, podcast host and super-connector who has transformed lives and accelerated careers. He’s the Founder & CEO of NetWorkWise, a business platform that expedites outcomes for people through training in the art and science of personal and professional networking. An entrepreneur at heart, Adam has spent over 20 years starting & building companies across a variety of industries. His sole focus these days is teaching people how to NetWorkWise.

 

Where do you feel most people go wrong when it comes to networking?

“the majority of people just don't understand what networking is and that's where they go wrong because a lot of people feel that it's dirty or they don't feel comfortable with it…”

 

What is it that you look for in your podcast guests?

“So, my podcast, it's called Conversations with Connors and there's three criteria to being on my show. Number one, it's kind of like the foundation of networking, that I know, like, and trust you with a little caveat and/or admire you, you know, maybe something that you've done or accomplished.”

 

How has your podcast benefited you?

“it turned out that this thing is really a really trendy thing to be doing and, you get enough listeners, it really benefits your business.”

 

How much time goes into your podcast?

“A significant amount of reading…I didn't realize what I was getting into.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“I'm going to take this back over 20 years with my friend Ernie, who I met over 20 years ago…”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“I think it really all starts with active listening. When I get to know people, I try to skip over the superficial stuff, the conversation and kind of dig in to, you know, kind of who they are and what fires them up…”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“Know their why. You know, why are they doing this? You know, their intent needs to be genuine, otherwise, it'll look dirty and it won't generate the kind of results that they might desire.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“Oh, it's a no brainer. I mean, traditional in-person relationship building is just standard. You know, they say gold standard, I say platinum.”

 

If you could go back 20 years, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“I'd probably cut toxic people out of my life quicker. There was some kind of statistic, it's like 5% of the negative people in your life are responsible for 95% of the bad things that happened to you.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“Start. They say the old Buddhist term is, you know, best time to have started something was 20 years ago. And the second-best time to start is today.”

 

You can get in contact with Adam at:

Website: www.networkwise.com

Sep 16, 2019

About Tim Manion & Kyle Baldwin

Tim Manion - Director of Business Development 

With a team of Account Executives, Tim curates, develops and manages relationships with potential clients, influencers and stakeholders. In his tenure he has had the opportunity to strategize across a diverse scope of industry and business models, ranging from fortune 50 companies to crowdsourced startups. Prior to joining the Catalyst team, Tim worked in medical sales and operations management.  

 

Kyle Baldwin - Director of Design

As the Director of Design at Catalyst, Kyle is responsible for creating meaningful engagements between people, brands, and places. He employs multi-disciplinary design methods to focus on the intersection of communication design and the built environment. Since joining in 2012, he has led some of the agency’s most unique, engaging, and interactive experiences for national brands such as RSA, FN America, GungHo Entertainment, Intel, CDW, and the Chicago Department of Aviation.

 

What is Catalyst Exhibits and what do you do?

Tim: “We work with various clients in every industry too, um, in its simplest form, bring them to a trade show.”

 

Trade shows are built around networking, what kind of thought goes into designing exhibits to foster the most comfortable environment to network within?

Kyle: “So, it's obviously becoming a much younger generation. The millennials are kind of driving a lot of different, uh, ways of selling and engaging with brands. And they're much better, much more educated about their products they're interested in because of the Internet.”

 

How do networking and social media affect business development and design, and what platforms do you see as the most influential?

Tim: “It's interesting to watch how people use LinkedIn in my day today. Um, I use it as an opportunity to figure out who I'm talking to. A lot of people use it for networking to get in touch with people, but when I step into a room to pitch any sort of deal, I'm looking at who's in the room…”

Kyle:” It’s an opportunity to have a more natural conversation with a company, with a person, with a brand…”


Trade shows are chaotic, what do you do to balance that stress?

Tim: “We get the opportunity to work with a lot of cool clients and they pulled back the curtain. Um, so half of it is just enjoying what you do and the natural curiosity to just figure out…”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

Tim: “I mean, the benefit of a trade show is the entire room is networking. Um, and I think the best experiences I've had is when a plan goes right, um, we put together pre-post-show marketing for any given client, um, and a client that's willing to listen…”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

Tim: “It's one thing at its very core on our end, you have to get, uh, a lot of trust from people. We're selling a picture really. Um, so it's being honest, upfront and sincere. Um, and then the follow-through, I'm on the show floor, sleeves rolled up, making sure everything happens…”

Kyle: “I'd say we, we kind of keep up with just what's happening in the organization through obviously the, you know, Internet and social media and things like that. So, we're always…”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

Tim: “You should value the people you bring into your fold. It shouldn't just be this person linked with me. You don't know what they do. You don't know who they like. If you're going to if I'm going to reach out to someone…”

Kyle: “I would say really like define what you want and what you would like to do. Right. And like find people doing that and kind of echo that career path in some way.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

Tim: “I'll say that the folks I hire right out of college are the best-suited people in the world at getting a hold of people. Everything is done digitally. Every platform they know, LinkedIn, Instagram, I mean these things are taught in college now. And when I was there…”

 

If you could go back 20 years, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

Tim: “Don't get bogged down in the details. Just possible. Yeah. Yeah. That's fun to watch. When you do hire people who do it, it's like managers notice that and they'll help you and they'll give you every nugget along the way. But if you're in there asking for handouts…”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

Kyle: “I'd say there's probably a few more up there like Polish share and you know, Stefan Sagmeister and things like that I would love the chance to meet...”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

Tim: “Just be honest.”

Kyle: “I'd say be fearless then in it as well because you have nothing to lose and it's your career and your path and just own it and you know, don't tread lightly on it. Go and attack every opportunity…”

 

You can get in contact with Tim at:

LinkedIn: Click Here

Email: tmannion@catalystexhibit.com(link sends e-mail)(link sends e-mail)

 

You can get in contact with Kyle at:

LinkedIn: Click Here

Sep 9, 2019

About Lisa Attonito

Lisa Attonito was named the Executive Director of the Women’s Fund of Greater Milwaukee in November of 2016. Committed to activating philanthropy to advance equity for women in our community, the focus is on economic empowerment, leadership skills, and education. The Women’s Fund is working to change attitudes, behaviors, and culture so Greater Milwaukee is an inclusive world-class community where women and girls realize their full potential, and everyone thrives.

Attonito has extensive experience in organizational management, board governance, staff development, budget creation and oversight, along with brand development and engagement. Her career includes senior positions with several well-known, best in class nonprofit organizations. She has always had a growth mindset and believes strongly in building brand experiences that reflect the culture and mission of the entity while supporting the strategic goals. Her track record of sales includes consistent success and a dynamic network that is fueled by sound project management and good communication.

 

What is your vision for the Women’s Fund of Greater Milwaukee? What is one of your proudest accomplishments?

“I am hoping to, um, establish or re-introduce the women's fund as a thought leader and community creator. As executives, we're terming off the board. We were able to add new directors to the group that are enthusiastic, that are excited, that have new networks and new ideas.”

 

What are you working on now?

“We are in the midst of planning our annual educational event. We use a title of women's Fund presents and then each year there's a different theme. And so, this year the theme is the future and we're focusing on the year 2030.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had? How was the connection made? What was the outcome of the connection?

“I met a friend, Lela Owner, Carrie Airway for an annual sort of social gathering in December for years in a row and taking advantage of social media Carrie posted among her friends…”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“One of the things I'm really committed to is keeping my LinkedIn profile current and not only current about my work experiences, but even my contact information.”

 

What advice would you offer to the business professional who is looking to grow their network?

“Be curious. Cause if you are curious, you don't have to work at being social. It just comes so naturally. And I think the more curious people are, the easier it is for them to talk to people that they don't know.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking- which do you find more value in? Please explain.

“I really think the best answer is a blend…whether you meet someone in person or online, eventually you have to do the other, right?

 

If you could go back to your 20-year-old self, what would you tell yourself to do more of/less of/differently with regards to your professional career?

“I think being vulnerable throughout life is really important, not only in interpersonal relationships and family relationships, but then I just think in general in building business relationships…”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree? How would you start that journey?

“I really love to meet everybody. I can be walking down the street and someone's walking towards me and there's something about them. Either I like the shoes they're wearing…”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“Terry Gross does a fantastic job interviewing so many people that I often am listening to her interviews. Sometimes they're historic, you know, and archived and some are in the moment.”

 

Any final word of advice to offer our listeners with regards to growing and supporting your network?

“Be sure to keep relationships that are strong, that are dependable, that you feel comfortable with…”

 

You can get in contact with Lisa at:

Email: lisa.attonito@gmail.com

LinkedIn: Click Here

 

Details on “The Future, 2030” can be found here.

Sep 2, 2019

About Mervyn Byrd

Mervyn has over 15 years in the banking industry, eventually opening his own commercial loan brokerage business. Today, he specializes in sales and leadership development for the Business Alliance. Two things remain constant with every position Mervyn has held—a love for people and passion to see others achieve their goals.

He recently discovered another powerful outlet to harness his passion for helping others after being recruited by Vistage (top corporate peer advisory org) to lead high performing groups.

 

What is Vistage?

“Vistage is 23,000 CEOs in 20 countries worldwide and key business leaders taking a step back from their businesses one day a month to reflect, get other input from other their peers.”

 

How are you ultimately recruited by Vistage?

“A good friend who is a Vistage Chair, and it was about a year and a half process where we had a conversation one day, we're sitting out for coffee and he says, Mervin, you really ought to consider this. You know, this is your passion. You love helping people, you love seeing people grow and you will be amazing.”

 

What prompted you to write the workshop “The Art of Networking”?

“The mission was to address what I saw, in my opinion, that was really going wrong out there. When I see people networking some of the a faux paux that they are making and wondering why networking is tough…”

 

Can you share with our listeners your most successful or favorite networking experience that you've had?

“I was in a job transition now seven, eight years ago after I closed down my commercial loan brokerage and I was out networking and someone who, who I'd met said, Hey, I think you need to talk to John about something…”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“I have a built-in process with the business alliance. We are a membership organization. We host events and programs, right? So, we do 75 plus of these a year. So, I'm constantly in front of my network in that capacity.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“Be a giver. Don't be in a rush to try to get. Just be a giver.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“For me, I'm a people person. Nothing beats a face to face conversation, sit down looking into another person's eyes and checking out their body language and all of that.”

 

If you could go back 20 years, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“I would just say break out of your shell. People aren't concerned about you, they're concerned about them.”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“I'm kind of a junkie when it comes to reading. Currently, I'm juggling only two…I just finished one, finished a third, Can't Hurt Me recently. And so, I'm reading The Power of Peers…”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“Get out there and get active. We see so many folks who get excited about being part of a new network and then they let their business or life get in the way.”

 

You can get in contact with Mervyn at:

LinkedIn: Click Here

Aug 19, 2019

About Mary Beth Klatt

Mary Beth Klatt is a writer with a specialty in writing about real estate, design, and historic preservation. She has been published in the Wall Street Journal, the Chicago Tribune, the Christian Science Monitor and other publications. She is also the host of the Mid-Century Modern Show, a podcast that focuses on all aspects of modernism as it relates to design, residential and commercial real estate and fashion. She's also using a typewriter for the second draft of her murder mystery novel.

 

What’s the appeal of typing thank you notes to your podcast guests?

“…I really hit the keys and that's what you want to do is to really connect with your keys. And I don’t know, I think it just makes the whole experience of writing just more three-dimensional.

 

Why are typewriters so popular now? Is it the “Tom Hanks” effect?

“Tom Hanks is hugely passionate about typewriters. He collects them all over the world. He, um, yeah, he's very vocal and he shares about all these typewriters and that has had the, uh, the rollover effect of actually affecting the sales…”

 

How can business professionals incorporate more use of typewriters in their work-life besides typing thank you notes?

“When you're having a writing freeze as something you're writing on your laptop, take a break, get on your typewriter and just write whatever you were trying to do on the laptop and just, you know, see if that kind of breaks through you're writing’s dry spell.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“But then maybe a couple months later I got a handwritten note from my nephew's wife and I almost burst into tears. I mean, it was so thoughtful and she kind of quoted back the card and I just felt so touched. Like I made a difference in the world.”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“I think those thank you notes are important. And you know what, I talked about typing but it doesn't have to be typed. I just think it needs to be personal.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“…focus on one thing and then do it.”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“…at the end of the day, we're still human beings with a need to connect with other human beings, face to face talking. And, um, I, I think you need both.”

 

If you could go back 20 years, what would you tell yourself to do more, or less, of regarding your career?

“I think my younger self would really say focus on the result. You know, what do you want to say, you know, you've done at the end of your life…”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with, and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“I've been talking about Tom Hanks the whole show. Actually, I have had this idea that I want to, and he's very good about this apparently, you can send Tom Hanks a note…”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“You know, you've got to read your genre, the murder mystery genre. But I'm also because I, uh, my, my protagonist is a nun, I'm also reading a lot of books that have religious elements right now…”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“Just focus on one way to really connect with people and go for it. And the payoff may not occur right away. You know, it may be weeks, months, years, but just go for it. Make your mark and just um, you know, personalize it.”

 

You can get in contact with Mary Beth Klatt at:

Apple Podcasts: Click Here

Instagram: Click Here

LinkedIn: Click Here

Aug 5, 2019

About Nick Myers

Nick Myers is the Founder and CEO of RedFox Creative in Madison, WI. RedFox Creative is a technology-driven marketing and consulting company that helps brands give themselves a voice through the power of AI and voice assistant technology. Nick is a TEDx speaker and has spoken across the U.S and soon internationally on topics ranging from the future of AI in the workplace, 360 video, AI and social media, and how brands can begin leveraging the power of Voice-First today to help tell their story.

 

How did you get involved in the AI and Voice-First space and why do you view it as being so valuable?

“So, my story is a bit interesting in how I got involved. You know truth be told, my background is actually in marketing and communications…”

 

How do you think AI and voice technology is going to impact marketing; specifically, social media?

“I think ultimately marketers are going to be the key decision-makers to actually, you know, moving the hand of C-level folks within large organizations to actually invest in it. But I think the one thing that's going to change above all else is just…”


Why is it important for brands to begin thinking about how they can leverage voice assistants in their marketing strategy?

“…But I'm trying to educate people saying that that's, that's fine and dandy, but you need to have a, a reason that you're doing it. You need to be solving some type of pain with their customers or from within your organization that voice can help solve.”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“So, couple months ago, actually back in September, October of last year, um, I was following, her name is Marie Ryan on Linkedin and I'm, I'm very, very active on Linkedin by the way…”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“So, it's become harder definitely over the past couple of years because I've been able to meet so many people and it's really hard to message and just interact with everybody. And it's almost like I have, you know, it’s actually on my to-do list every week, I have a follow up with, like a bunch of people.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“A first piece of advice as if you're not on LinkedIn. Get on LinkedIn because like I said, most of my success over the past couple of years since starting…”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“Actually, I'm going to go ahead and say a combination of both because I would say a lot of the really strong relationships, I've met actually have been in person more so than online…”

 

If you could go back 20 years, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“Learn Code, Learn Code, get more involved in computer science. I mean, that is definitely the first thing I would tell myself, especially being in the space…’

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“I would go and head right now and say somebody that I really would like to connect with. Truth be told, and this'll never happen is Jeff Bezos of Amazon just because I guess I've been working so much in the voice space…”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“So, one thing I'm telling people is if you really want to pull the trigger now is the time, while we are still kind of in the early stages here…”

 

You can get in contact with Nick at:

LinkedIn: Click Here

Email: nickm@redfoxcreate.com

Twitter: Click Here

Jul 29, 2019

About Theresa Wilmot

Theresa is the brand stylist, graphic designer and creative problem solver of Wilmot Designs, LLC. She works with business owners to help them give a voice to their message and mission through creative and effective design. Her background includes working for a global consumer goods company in their art department, a theater playbill publication and a hat company where she had her first experience with textile design. Theresa is taking her business to the next level with fun, new clients!

 

What does a graphic designer do?

“…Someone in business for themselves probably does a wider variety of things than a person who works for a larger agency. And those things can span the, both the print and digital world.”

 

How did you decide to start your own design business?

“So, after working in the areas that I worked in professionally, um, I say professionally, but for someone else, I, decided to go out on my own because we were living in Bentonville, Arkansas at the time…”

 

How does a well-developed brand communicate the message and mission of a business effectively?

“So, a well-developed brand like I was saying before, is more than just your logo. It is your presence when you are not there. So, what a well-developed brand should do is communicate…”

 

Can you share with me your most successful or favorite networking story/experience that you’ve had?

“I belong to a women network and my favorite story out of that group so far is having volunteered to help with a promotional booklet that they were going to put together for a women's entrepreneurship week here in Milwaukee.”

 

How do you stay in front of or best nurture your network community?

“I'm actually just getting to know the people themselves because to me, part of networking is not only what I could do for them, but what they could do maybe for someone that I know or even for myself.”

 

What advice do you have for the professional on growing their network?

“I would say to not be afraid of it, be open to the idea of it as being something that could be very natural and not canned or fake…”

 

Digital networking or traditional networking?

“I think about this a lot lately just because of the business I'm in. And I think right now I'd have to say the traditional sense just because it's newer to me and I'm typically, I'm pretty good at making connect genuine connections with people.”

 

If you could go back 20 years, what would you tell yourself to do more or less of regarding your career?

“To trust that I am enough, that I am talented enough that I am skinny enough that I am funny enough that I, I feel like back in my twenties I doubted myself a lot.”

 

We’ve all heard of the 6 degrees of separation… Now, who would be the one person you’d love to connect with, and do you think you could do it within the 6th degree?

“Aaron Draplin, the graphic designer, um, who I've been following… I would love to connect with him because he is a designer without, um, he seems very approachable. I think that's a good way to put it.”

 

What book are you reading right now?

“I love yours because it's, you interview a wide range of guests in a wide variety of businesses, um, about networking but also about their business journeys.”

 

Any final words of advice for our listeners?

“I would just say to be patient with yourself. Um, don't go into networking thinking that you have to, you know, make so many contacts right away or I know some people do that, some people have goals, you know, they want to make so many contacts at this event or that event.”

 

You can get in contact with Theresa at:

Facebook: Click Here

LinkedIn: Click Here

https://www.wilmotdesigns.com/

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